101 Things Everyone Should Know About Economics: A Down and Dirty Guide to Everything from Securities and Derivatives to Interest Rates and Hedge Funds - And What They Mean For You

101 Things Everyone Should Know About Economics: A Down and Dirty Guide to Everything from Securities and Derivatives to Interest Rates and Hedge Funds - And What They Mean For You

Peter Sander

Language: English

Pages: 141

ISBN: 2:00135503

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

101 Things Everyone Should Know About Economics: A Down and Dirty Guide to Everything from Securities and Derivatives to Interest Rates and Hedge Funds - And What They Mean For You

Peter Sander

Language: English

Pages: 141

ISBN: 2:00135503

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


What you don't know about economics can hurt you - now more than ever. This easy-to-understand guide answers all the questions you need to know to secure your financial future, such as:* What does it mean to my paycheck when the Fed lowers or raises interest rates?
* What's the difference between bonds, securities, and derivatives - and which should I invest in now?
* What does Keynesian economics have to do with my savings?
For those people whose heads spin when reading the business pages of the newspaper, here's a roadmap through the economic jungle. In simple, plain language, Peter Sander explains how economies work, why they grow, how they contract, and what the government can and can't do to help them. Most important, he tells you how all this affects you - and what kind of changes you're going to see in your finances as a result.

Economics has been called the dismal" science. But it doesn't need to be gloomy or impenetrable. This book is an essential guide for anyone who wants to understand where the economy is today, where it's going, and what it means for the rest of us.
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the Fed does not control the rate directly, but does it instead through open market operations. What You Should Know With open market operations, the Fed adds or subtracts money from the economy, influencing the supply and demand balance for money and thus the interest rate, or price for that money. Open market operations are the method used by the Fed to bring the true Fed funds rate in line with the target rate, as well as to more directly moderate the amount of money in the system. The

deposits (largely, checking account and other short term account balances) set aside in reserve to meet customer withdrawals, written checks and other routine transactions. The reserve requirement represents the “fraction” of the fractional reserve banking system (see #34) kept “at home” to meet customer demand. What You Should Know The Federal Reserve, specifically the Fed Board of Governors, mandates the reserve requirement. Today, it is 10 percent for transaction accounts exceeding $43.9

clients, and so on. The term brokerage firm usually refers to a company that deals in stocks. In addition, brokers often make recommendations to their clients about what to buy and sell, but in most cases the buy or sell decision rests with the client. Capital. In economic terms, capital is one of three factors involved in the production of goods or services (the others are land and labor). Capital can include goods or physical assets like factories or equipment, or financial assets like cash or

important units of international exchange for those operating in the highest levels of foreign trade and financial flows. What You Should Know Eurodollars are U.S. dollar deposits held outside the United States (anywhere, not just Europe), and as a result, aren’t subject to U.S. banking and specifically Federal Reserve regulations. They have nothing to do with the European common currency but rather the location of most of the banks that hold them. Eurodollars allow U.S. corporations to keep

known as deleveraging (see #9). The challenge of the government is to intervene effectively to help out the economy. The Great Depression led to a significant banking panic. As banks failed, the government adopted a “laissez-faire” mentality, letting weaker elements be flushed from the system. This approach is good in theory, but it accelerated the panic. A misguided attempt to protect American business through trade tariffs failed miserably and made the problem worse. Government may intervene,

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