A History of Cambodia, 4th Edition

A History of Cambodia, 4th Edition

Language: English

Pages: 384

ISBN: 0813343631

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

A History of Cambodia, 4th Edition

Language: English

Pages: 384

ISBN: 0813343631

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


In this clear and concise volume, author David Chandler provides a timely overview of Cambodia, a small but increasingly visible Southeast Asian nation. Praised by the Journal of Asian Studies as an “original contribution, superior to any other existing work,” this acclaimed text has now been completely revised and updated to include material examining the early history of Cambodia, whose famous Angkorean ruins now attract more than one million tourists each year, the death of Pol Pot, and the revolution and final collapse of the Khmer Rouge. The fourth edition reflects recent research by major scholars as well as Chandler’s long immersion in the subject and contains an entirely new section on the challenges facing Cambodia today, including an analysis of the current state of politics and sociology and the increasing pressures of globalization. This comprehensive overview of Cambodia will illuminate, for undergraduate students as well as general readers, the history and contemporary politics of a country long misunderstood.

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farce. No evidence was offered in Pol Pot’s or Ieng Sary’s defense, and the two men were condemned to death. Soon afterward, the DK interrogation center at Tuol Sleng was inaugurated by the Vietnamese as a genocidal museum. The use of the word genocide and comparisons of Pol Pot to Hitler suggested that as far as the PRK was concerned, DK had had a fascist rather than a Communist government.5 Cambodian woman and Vietnamese soldier, 1980. Photo by Grant Evans. OPPOSITION TO THE PRK The PRK

ways that remain obscure but that probably were connected with the power of priestly-bureaucratic families around the king. His administration was an urbanizing one. A French scholar, Henri Mestrier du Bourg, has shown that, whereas for the preceding three reigns roughly twenty toponyms contained in inscriptions end with the suffix pura, or “city” (cf. Singapore, the “lion city”), under Suryavarman the number jumped to forty-seven, further evidence that his rise to power involved herding people

great. His wives, for example, were local women. He lived in a simple house, chewed betel, and sponsored festivals at the wat and ceremonies to propitiate the nak ta. These officials shared their clients’ food, their belief in magic, their vigorous sense of the absurd, and their distrust of other officials and outsiders. Probably because they lived among the people they supposedly controlled, chaovay sruk were more responsive to local issues than were authorities in the capital. The fact that all

Bangkok and able to work through a well-established network of loyal officials in the sruk. But the Vietnamese still occupied a strong bargaining position, particularly as they retained Cambodia’s regalia, without which Duang could not legitimately ascend the throne. In a face-saving gesture, they demanded that a tributary mission headed by a Cambodian official travel to Hué in March 1846 and declare Cambodia’s pro forma subservience to Vietnam.54 When the embassy returned to Phnom Penh in June

a French résident, Félix Louis Bardez, in rural Kompong Chnang in 1925. The first of these revealed how little the French knew about communications and social organization in Cambodia after more than fifty years of being in control. The second, perhaps because it was the only incident of its kind in the colonial era, shocked the regime and was blown out of proportion in postcolonial times by Cambodian nationalist writers. THE 1916 AFFAIR To understand the 1916 Affair, we must remember that

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