A Platter of Figs and Other Recipes

A Platter of Figs and Other Recipes

David Tanis

Language: English

Pages: 294

ISBN: 1579653464

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

A Platter of Figs and Other Recipes

David Tanis

Language: English

Pages: 294

ISBN: 1579653464

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Forget about getting back to the land, David Tanis just wants you to get back to the kitchen

For six months a year, David Tanis is the head chef at Chez Panisse, the Berkeley, California, restaurant where he has worked alongside Alice Waters since the 1980s in creating a revolution in sustainable American cuisine. The other six months, Tanis lives in Paris in a seventeenth-century apartment, where he hosts intimate dinners for friends and paying guests, and prepares the food in a small kitchen equipped with nothing more than an old stove, a little counter space, and a handful of wellused pots and pans.

This is the book for anyone who wants to gather and feed friends around a table and nurture their conversation. It’s not about showing off with complicated techniques and obscure ingredients. Worlds away from the showy Food Network personalities, Tanis believes that the most satisfying meals—for both the cook and the guest—are invariably the simplest.

Home cooks can easily re-create any of his 24 seasonal, market-driven menus, from spring’s Supper of the Lamb (Warm Asparagus Vinaigrette; Shoulder of Spring Lamb with Flageolet Beans and Olive Relish; Rum Baba with Cardamom) to winter’s North African Comfort Food (Carrot and Coriander Salad; Chicken Tagine with Pumpkin and Chickpeas). Best of all, Tanis is an engaging guide with a genuine gift for words, whose soulful approach to food will make any kitchen, big or small, a warm and compelling place to spend time.

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Lulu, I sensed immediately a down-to-earth grace, generosity, true joie de vivre. On my visit to her old family vineyard in Bandol, she apologized that we weren’t eating outside, where any normal person would want to be, but there was the mistral: it was too windy. We did have a glass of their Domaine Tempier rosé in the garden where her son was readying the fire for quail. Even inside that old formal Provençal dining room, with Lulu’s grandmother’s great armoire, the meal felt as easy as if we

necessity. Some days, I’m convinced that sunny-side up eggs are the best; other days I want my eggs poached—perhaps for lunch in a red wine sauce. Fried eggs have all sorts of possibilities. On a slice of bread drizzled with good olive oil, or on a plate of spicy spaghetti. Or my childhood fave, a version of egg-in-the-hole we used to call eggs James Cagney (for long-forgotten reasons), where you cut out a circle in a slice of bread with a water glass, melt some butter in a pan, lay in the

leaves 1 cup dry white wine 6 cups Fish Stock (recipe follows) or Light Chicken Stock (page 73) Roasted Pepper Sauce (recipe follows) 1 small bunch parsley, leaves roughly chopped Clean and debeard the mussels and put them in a bowl. Cover with a damp towel and refrigerate. Season the fish with salt and pepper. Sprinkle over the saffron, garlic, and thyme. Drizzle with 3 tablespoons olive oil and massage in the seasoning. Cover and refrigerate for up to several hours. In a large

water Olive oil ½ teaspoon salt ½ cup raisins, plumped in warm water and drained ¼ cup pine nuts A few rosemary sprigs, leaves roughly chopped Preheat the oven to 425°F. Put the chestnut flour in a large bowl. Whisk in the water and mix well to remove lumps. Stir in 3 tablespoons olive oil and the salt. The mixture will resemble thick pancake batter. Grease a 12-inch cast-iron skillet generously with olive oil. Pour in the batter. Sprinkle the raisins over the batter, then the pine nuts

There’s no denying the flavor of a good tomato picked ripe or a cucumber straight from the garden or a new-crop apple. The experience is pure and sensual. serving food: pretty versus beautiful Generally I don’t like pretty food, but I am in awe of beautiful food. Here’s what I mean: I think food should look natural, not contrived. Plums in a bowl are nothing more than a repetition of shapes: what could be more beautiful? Tender green beans—briefly cooked, dressed with oil, and gently piled

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