A Practical Guide to Clinical Virology

A Practical Guide to Clinical Virology

Language: English

Pages: 306

ISBN: 0471950971

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

A Practical Guide to Clinical Virology

Language: English

Pages: 306

ISBN: 0471950971

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


This Second Edition of A Practical Guide to Clinical Virology is a practical, highly illustrated, quick reference guide to clinical virology. It brings together the essentials of the subject in a entertaining and informative style, describing in turn the clinical features, the symptoms and signs of each of the viral diseases, as well as summarising the epidemiology, laboratory diagnosis and therapy in each case. This book also includes general chapters on classification, diagnosis of infection, antiviral drugs, vaccines and different clinical syndromes.

Key Features:

  • Chapter summaries for quick reference
  • Cartoon illustrations
  • Comprehensive coverage
  • Clear and concise format

Each chapter is easy to read and well organised, ensuring that this is an invaluable textbook for all medical, biomedical, microbiology and applied biology students. In addition, it provides an excellent reference for nurses, occupational health and infection control departments, public health and diagnostic laboratories.

Critical Path

The Weather Experiment: The Pioneers Who Sought to See the Future

Select Philosophical Works

Essentials of Medical Biochemistry: With Clinical Cases

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

as a potential explosive and not as a biological. Numerous clinical trials have shown that prophylactic administration as a tablet given twice a day will prevent influenza A (H3N2, H1N1 or H2N2) clinical infection in 70–80% of individuals. Unfortunately it has no inhibitory effect against influenza B viruses which are important viruses causing mortality about every fourth year. Nervousness is the main side-effect noted in about 8% of persons receiving 200 mg amantadine per day but dosage 31 can

Smallpox Eradication Programme of 1967 organized through the World Health Organization (WHO), led to the complete elimination in 1977 of one of mankind’s great scourges. A long time had passed since Jenner in l796 successfully inoculated a farmer’s boy with pustule material from a dairymaid suffering from cowpox (see illustration to Chapter 41). Additional achievements during the 20th century have been the introduction of many new virus vaccines, e.g. polio, measles, rubella, mumps, rabies,

of vaccine material be developed, ensuring both priming and booster doses at a single visit to the clinic? . More effective adjuvants and vaccine vehicles should be developed. Especially important are designed molecules that can ensure uptake by epithelial cells at the mucosal linings. . How can a more potent mucosal response be stimulated? . How can we ensure better long-term immunological memory? . How can we more effectively stimulate CTL response for inactivated vaccines? . Using ‘naked’ DNA as

and primary infections with a high morbidity occur with high frequency. Differential diagnosis. Congenital CMV infections must be distinguished from congenital rubella and toxoplasmosis by laboratory means. CMV 151 mononucleosis closely resembles EBV mononucleosis clinically, but can be differentiated by the lack of heterophile antibodies and the application of CMV antibody tests. CMV infections in immunocompromised individuals are often complicated by other infections which make the clinical

drugs have been licensed recently to join the M2 blocker amantadine (Lysovir) Human herpes viruses (HHV1–8) No vaccines exist. The disease is lifelong and None recurrent infections are common. Prodrugs are now utilized but successful chemotherapy is restricted to one member of this large family, HSV-1 Respiratory viruses Impossible to A myriad of 150 common cold viruses, six differentiate adenoviruses, four parainfluenzaviruses and clinically and coronaviruses inhabit the upper respiratory

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