A Writer's Coach: The Complete Guide to Writing Strategies That Work

A Writer's Coach: The Complete Guide to Writing Strategies That Work

Language: English

Pages: 304

ISBN: 1400078695

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

A Writer's Coach: The Complete Guide to Writing Strategies That Work

Language: English

Pages: 304

ISBN: 1400078695

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Mystified over misplaced modifiers? In a trance from intransitive verbs? Paralyzed from using the passive voice? To aid writers, from beginners to professionals, legendary writing coach Jack Hart presents a comprehensive, practical, step-by-step approach to the writing process. He shares his techniques for composing and sustaining powerful writing and demonstrates how to overcome the most common obstacles such as procrastination, writer’s block, and excessive polishing. With instructive examples and excerpts from outstanding writing to provide inspiration, A Writer’s Coach is a boon to writers, editors, teachers, and students.

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challenge your own answers, sifting through the issues until you finally come up with a preliminary hypothesis. The often-quoted Chief Seattle speech sent me down one such road. Seattle, or Sealth, the most prominent tribal leader during the early days of the city named for him, is well known in the Pacific Northwest. The speech attributed to him, a sentimental denunciation of the white man's disregard for the land, is often trotted out to promote environmental causes. I sympathize with its

cooling can result in breakage, each piece must endure the slow cooling of the annealing ovens where the glass is gradually reduced to air temperature. . . . The prison-break sequence employs specific techniques to grab your attention. The glassblowing sequence neglects them. The trick is knowing what they are and how you can put them to work. You can start by thinking of writing in terms of personality. How we say something reflects, to some degree, who we are. So it's no great surprise that

Journalism Review, prowls the nation's newspaper headlines looking for laughs. More often than not, dangling modifiers supply them: "Teens can't talk about sex with mom.""Legislators hold forum on electric grid?' But most danglers contribute confusion—not humor—to the news columns: Former Mayor Tom Bradley suffered a stroke Thursday while recovering from heart surgery that affected his ability to move the right side of his body, doctors said. Clearly, the writer meant to say that the stroke—not

patterns of incredible complexity. The simplest structural element in prose rhythm is sentence length. Writers with sensitive ears deliberately vary the lengths of their sentences as they strive for variety and balance. Sentences of similar lengths can become structural elements that repeat rhythms and play off sentences of different lengths. Notice, for example, how the three short sentences that conclude this Jonathan Susskind paragraph from the Seattle Post- Intelligencer serve as counterpoint

beyond that level. Who can form a mental image of a vertebrate? Of a living thing? The dasses are too large. The points in common are too few. Eventually, you approach the top rung, which represents the class containing everything. At that rarefied height, all the members of the class have no characteristic in common, except that they all exist. Writing at that level produces no mental images at all. Nonetheless, most useful knowledge occupies rungs fairly high on the ladder of abstraction.

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