African Folktales (The Pantheon Fairy Tale and Folklore Library)

African Folktales (The Pantheon Fairy Tale and Folklore Library)

Language: English

Pages: 378

ISBN: 0394721179

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

African Folktales (The Pantheon Fairy Tale and Folklore Library)

Language: English

Pages: 378

ISBN: 0394721179

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Nearly 100 stories from over 40 tribe-related myths of creation, tales of epic deeds, ghost stories and tales set in both the animal and human realms.

Part of the Pantheon Fairy Tale and Folklore Library

Reconsidering Olmec Visual Culture: The Unborn, Women, and Creation (William and Bettye Nowlin Series in Art, History, and Culture of the Western Hemisphere)

Legends of the Jews

1300 Real and Fanciful Animals from Seventeenth-Century Engravings (Dover Pictorial Archive)

The Hurricane Party

American Gods (The 10th Anniversary Edition)

Hammered (The Iron Druid Chronicles, Book 3)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

through dissension. Four times Wagadu changed her name. First she was called Dierra, then Agada, then Ganna, then Silla. Four times she turned her face. Once to the north, once to the west, once to the east, and once to the south. For Wagadu, whenever men have seen her, has always had four gates: one to the north, one to the west, one to the east, and one to the south. Those are the directions whence the strength of Wagadu comes, the strength in which she endures no matter whether she be built of

Ikpoom’s voice was shrilly angry when, as the girl, he warned lovers off the farm and threatened to shoot them with bow and arrow. His voice was eerie and his song uncanny as he portrayed the chief of the underworld sprites, Agundu, who is a head with wild, red eyes and with gouts of blood on the raw cut neck that terminates the creature. He showed us how Agundu borrowed the radiance of the sun and moon and with them dazzled the girl, how she followed this bright illusion away from her own people

also gave to her the twenty rupees which he had left. As he went his way, she said to him, “Tell your wife to be content with what she has, and not to seek for that which she doesn’t have.” When he reached his home, he gave to Fatima the cloth of Pembe Mirui, and told her everything that had happened. Fatima received him with joy, and, hearing of all the dangers through which he had passed, and of what the old woman had said, listened no more to the idle talk of the women, but devoted herself to

kinds of talk available in a speech-community. This is what Griaule documents, in fact, in his Conversations with Ogôtomelli, referred to above. Though this book is unique for the depth and intensity of its reporting on a single tribal philosopher, a number of other workers in the field have explored such native systems more generally, especially the categories of tale. Of these systems, none is more complex, nor more fascinating, than that reported by Deirdre LaPin of the Yoruba. This populous

fellow, and always kept his own promises, believed him. He took the box on his head, and Anansi hurried off. Needless to say, the sly fellow had not the least intention of keeping his word. Mr. Ant waited in vain for his return—and was obliged to wander all the rest of his life with the box on his head. That is the reason we so often see ants carrying great bundles as they hurry along. —Hausa 59 Their Soft Crowns Discovered At one time, all the eagles and hawks used to be afraid of fowls, Land

Download sample

Download