All Yesterdays' Parties: The Velvet Underground in Print, 1966-1971

All Yesterdays' Parties: The Velvet Underground in Print, 1966-1971

Language: English

Pages: 320

ISBN: 0306814773

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

All Yesterdays' Parties: The Velvet Underground in Print, 1966-1971

Language: English

Pages: 320

ISBN: 0306814773

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


The Velvet Underground, among the most influential bands of all time, are credited with creating a streetwise, pre-punk sensibility that has become inseparable from the popular image of downtown New York. "Discovered" by Andy Warhol in 1966, the VU - with their original line-up of Lou Reed, John Cale, Sterling Morrison, and Mo Tucker - would soon become the house band of the avantgarde, composing songs simultaneously furious in their abrasiveness and beautiful in their pathos, standing in striking contrast to the prevailing flower power of the era. All Yesterdays' Parties gathers for the first time almost all of the published writings contemporary with the band's existence-from sources as mainstream as the New York Times to vanished voices of the counterculture like Oz, Fusion, and Crawdaddy! The book is a revealing snapshot of an era by trailblazing rock writers such as Lester Bangs, Robert Greenfield, and Paul Williams. With photographs, posters, and other visual evocations of the period throughout, All Yesterdays' Parties is an invaluable resource, a trove of lore for anyone interested in the VU, their roots, and legacy.

The Elements of Journalism, Revised and Updated: What Newspeople Should Know and the Public Should Expect

American Gangster: And Other Tales of New York

Mr. Wilson's Cabinet of Wonder: Pronged Ants, Horned Humans, Mice on Toast, and Other Marvels of Jurassic Technology

Selected Crônicas

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

energies which first emerged on the West Coast are finding their focus and direction here. Like Mel Lyman, the Velvet Underground have made their “Declaration of Creation” and translated it into sound: I am going to burn down the world I am going to tear down everything that cannot stand alone I am going to turn ideals to shit I am going to shove hope up your ass I am going to reduce everything that stands to rubble and then I am going to burn the rubble and then I am going to scatter the

years later, they have produced a sound consistent, integral and almost without parallel in rock. For those three years it was Lou Reed, Sterling Morrison, Maureen Tucker and John Cale. Toward the end of 1968, Doug Yule replaced Cale and the emphasis and personality of the band changed, first imperceptibly, then strikingly. From the beginning they were a gathering-point for hip people. They did the Cafe Bizarre and starved a little. At the film-maker’s Cinematheque they played behind the screen

the west coast, its hermetic nourishment and thalidomide culture, couldn’t qualify as even bizarrely noteworthy back east. Brought up in Levittown, Brooklyn, Pelham, Peter Cooper Village, Jamaica or the West Side, one would find it difficult to comprehend a state of nature such as California proposed. New York is a series of unrequited loves, interrupted trips, false openings and premature closings. Flower children came to New York to die—their strengths weren’t equal to the exposure. People who

thing, somewhat like Donovan but much more earthy, and with words that will kill you: “Put the jelly on your shoulders / Let us do what you feel most / that from which you recoil / Uh still makes your eyes moist.” Perhaps the greatest surprise here is “Jesus,” a prayer no less. The yearning for the state of grace reflected there culminates in “I’m Set Free,” a joyous hymn of liberation. The Velvets never seemed so beautifully close to the Byrds before. The album is unfortunately not without its

academic wankers to pick over). What is unsaid but implied is that this is an image they put on, a hype, a good gimmick, etc., like Dr. John and his phony voodoo or Black Sabbath or . . . need I name more. In fact it’s merely an honest description of the experience of most people living in the sickest city capitalism has so far spewed up. But more important it’s not far removed from the experience of lots of other people in London, Manchester, Paris, Rome, Detroit and even, dare I say it, San

Download sample

Download