An Edible Mosaic: Middle Eastern Fare with Extraordinary Flair [Middle Eastern Cookbook, 80 Recipes]

An Edible Mosaic: Middle Eastern Fare with Extraordinary Flair [Middle Eastern Cookbook, 80 Recipes]

Faith E. Gorsky

Language: English

Pages: 144

ISBN: 0804842760

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

An Edible Mosaic: Middle Eastern Fare with Extraordinary Flair [Middle Eastern Cookbook, 80 Recipes]

Faith E. Gorsky

Language: English

Pages: 144

ISBN: 0804842760

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Cook vibrant and healthy dishes with this accessible Middle Eastern cookbook.

When Faith Gorsky married her Middle Eastern husband, she married more than just the man. She found herself introduced to a fascinating culture and cuisine that would forever change how she experienced food and cooking.

Faith's mother-in-law took her under her wing and in 6 months gave her a thorough course in Middle Eastern cooking that became the basis for her popular website, An Edible Mosaic. The growth and success of her website and her own developing interest led to more trips to the Middle East, deepening her knowledge of the cuisine which she shares in An Edible Mosaic.

In her new cookbook, Faith imparts her favorite Middle Eastern recipes, recipes anyone can make with a little work and some help from Faith! Her love for the cuisine of her husband's homeland shows in her enthusiasm for these dishes and the awareness that food is more than just a means of sustenance for the people of the Middle East—it lies at the epicenter of their gatherings with family and friends.

Delicious Middle Eastern recipes include:

  • Parsley Salad with Bulgur Wheat (Tabbouleh)
  • Creamy Chickpea and Yogurt Casserole (Fetteh)
  • Mashed Fava Beans with Olive Oil, Lemon Juice, and Garlic (Foul Mudammas)
  • Ground Chicken Kebabs (Kebab Dajaj)
  • Sumac-Spiced Chicken (M'sakhkhan)
  • Upside-Down Rice Casserole (Maqluba)
  • Date-Filled Cookies (Ma'amoul)
  • And many more…

The only traditional way to prepare authentic Middle Eastern food is to watch cooks in action. Nothing is written down, there are no cooking times, few enumerated steps, and certainly no measurements. With An Edible Mosaic the secrets of Arab and Mediterranean cooking become simple and demystified.

Breakfast in Bed: More Than 150 Recipes for Delicious Morning Meals

Superfoods Soups & Stews: Over 70 Quick & Easy Gluten Free Recipes (Superfoods Today, Volume 16)

How to Cook Everything Vegetarian: Simple Meatless Recipes for Great Food

Let's Talk Turkey . . . and All the Trimmings

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

it is slightly bitter and very fragrant. It is used sparingly, usually in conjunction with orange blossom water, to flavor sweets and sometimes savory dishes. Along with orange blossom water, it is the main flavoring in Rose and Orange Blossom-Scented Milk Pudding (page 127). Saffron (Zafaran): This spice is the stigmas of the Crocus sativus flower; it can be found in whole threads or ground, but using whole threads is preferred. Saffron has a bittersweet, earthy flavor and should be used

fineground durum wheat. It is commonly used to make custard-like dishes, such as Lebanese Nights (page 121). It is also used to give a rustic texture to cakes (see Coconut Semolina Cake, page 130), and a crumbly, coarse texture to cookies. Sumac (Sumac): Not to be confused Shredded Phyllo Dough (Kataifi): with poison sumac, this spice is the dried berry of non-poisonous sumac bushes. Depending on the variety used, sumac’s color can range from brick red to purple to brown. It has a fruity, sour

and boil 2 minutes (if you want thin syrup) and up to 5 minutes (if you want thick syrup), swirling the pan occasionally. (The syrup will thicken more upon cooling.) 3 Turn off heat and stir in the rose water or orange blossom water; cool to room temperature, then use. {Lamb and Rice Stuffing} Beef can be used instead of lamb in this stuffing. This recipe yields enough stuffing to make 1 batch of Stuffed Marrow Squash (page 107), or to stuff 2 lb/1 kg of baby eggplant, small bell peppers, or

Eggplant with Garlic and Parsley Dressing (page 53) to Falafel (page 81) to Spicy Potatoes (page 57)— all contain fried components. If you follow proper frying procedures, food doesn’t absorb an excessive amount of oil; instead, you’re left with a crispy exterior and tender interior. When you fry, make sure to choose the right oil; in Middle Eastern cooking, good quality corn oil is typically used for frying, but any good oil with a high smoke point will work. The next point to consider is what

useful tool for frying is the spider strainer (page 17) and also, something called a splatter guard, which is a circular mesh cover with a handle that is placed on pans when frying to prevent oil from spattering out. Of course, if you really don’t want to fry in the traditional way, “oven-frying” is also an option for most foods; in this method, foods are lightly coated in oil and cooked in a hot oven until crisp outside and soft inside. For a description of “oven-frying” as pertaining to

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