Analog Science Fiction and Fact (December 2010)

Analog Science Fiction and Fact (December 2010)

Language: English

Pages: 124

ISBN: B018ZZPMTU

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Analog Science Fiction and Fact (December 2010)

Language: English

Pages: 124

ISBN: B018ZZPMTU

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Published since 1930, Analog Science Fiction and Fact is one of the most enduring and popular magazines of science fiction. Its editorial emphasis is on realistic stories that reflect high standards of scientific accuracy, imagination, and lively articles about current research on the frontiers of real science. A recurrent theme in both fiction and provocative opinion columns is the human impact of science and technology.
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The December issue again offers an unusual combination of a story and a closely associated fact article. The story is Shane Tourtellotte’s “The Man from Downstream,” about a time traveler who does what he does for an unusual reason, and then faces an unexpected challenge about what to do next. The fact article is Tourtellotte’s “Tips for the Budget Time-Traveler,” which takes a quantitative look at some of the very practical problems such a traveler would inevitably face.
Also a couple of stories that are parts of series —Christopher L. Bennett’s “Home Is Where the Hub Is,” and Brian C. Coad’s “A Placebo Effect,” in which long-suffering patent attorney Wally Mason is temporarily coaxed out of retirement—as well as some that aren’t. One of those, H. G. Stratmann’s “Primum Non Nocere,” could easily be considered a seasonal special, in a sneaky sort of way—though it could also be considered several other things, too.

The Duel

A Face in the Crowd

Fantasy & Science Fiction (Extended Edition) (July/August 2012)

Fearsome Journeys (The New Solaris Book of Fantasy)

Ballad of the Sad Cafe and Other Stories

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Honor: Kelley Armstrong; Artist Guest of Honor; Josh Simpson; Fan Guest of Honor: René Walling; Webcomic Guest of Honor: Shaenon Garrity. Membership: $50 until 31 December 2010,... BRASS TACKS Dear Stan, Thanks for printing my letter, and for the factual correction on “bahiana.” Thanks also for recounting your math-class experience (similar to many of my experiences in school) in “The Halo Handicap.” Many of the folks I know—many of whom read Analog—find... Top of Reader's Departments

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Sniffles, clearly sensing something was wrong, went from bunyip to bunyip, licking the creatures’ hands and whining. After a few seconds, Angelina said, “At least there’ll be no more barking bunyips.” Roger bit his lip. It seemed a particularly mean-spirited remark from his boss. Then, after another quarter minute or so, the bunyips began to move—slowly, as if they were falling in molasses. The bunyips bent at the waist. Then their lower legs bent in the opposite direction than human legs

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