Ancient Greek Religion

Ancient Greek Religion

Jon D. Mikalson

Language: English

Pages: 256

ISBN: 140518177X

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Ancient Greek Religion

Jon D. Mikalson

Language: English

Pages: 256

ISBN: 140518177X

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Ancient Greek Religion provides an introduction to the fundamental beliefs, practices, and major deities of Greek religion.

  • Focuses on Athens in the classical period
  • Includes detailed discussion of Greek gods and heroes, myth and cult, and vivid descriptions of Greek religion as it was practiced
  • Ancient texts are presented in boxes to promote thought and discussion, and abundant illustrations help readers visualize the rich and varied religious life of ancient Greece
  • Revised edition includes additional boxed texts and bibliography, an 8-page color plate section, a new discussion of the nature of Greek “piety,” and a new chapter on Greek Religion and Greek Culture

MythOS

La gran divergencia: Cómo y por qué llegaron a ser diferentes el Viejo Mundo y el Nuevo

The Fall of Arthur

Ancient Mysteries of Britain

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

received public cult at their tombs. They thus are intermediary figures between gods and humans, and some incline more to the divine side, some more to the human. The focal point of the hero’s cult was the tomb. The tomb was often surrounded by a fence, and, like the sanctuary of a god, everything in the heroön (hero sanctuary) was “sacred.” Heroes often received sacrifices of animals, much like those of the gods, sometimes as holocausts but most often to be distributed as a banquet for the

must be treated carefully and who must be honored and worshiped properly. Semele, her union with Zeus and her death, Cadmus the king, Teiresias the seer, the maenads roaming the mountainside dressed in fawnskins and carrying the thyrsos, the dismemberment of a living being, and Dionysus’ gift of wine were themes known and represented in art and literature throughout the Greek world, but the actual cult based on these combined elements was centered in Thebes, the city in which the myth placed

those who “did not respect the divine things” be brought to trial for disrespect of the gods (Plutarch, Life of Pericles 32.2). And there was a fifth-century law that forbade the importation of a “foreign god” without, presumably, the approval of the Ekklesia (Josephus, Contra Apionem 2.267). In the Classical period a few Athenians, including Socrates, were brought to trial for violating such laws, and, as in Socrates’ case, the punishments could be very severe, including death or exile. [There

certain religious traditions, and he himself had defecated on statues of the goddess Hecate. A speaker in a courtroom oration composed by Lysias (frag. 73 [Thalheim]) describes the punishment which the gods imposed upon Cinesias: Respect and fear the gods. This keeps a man from doing or saying disrespectful things. Theognis, lines 1179–80, to his friend Cyrnus Let no one wish to be unjust and let no one sail with perjurers. I, a god, speak to mortals. Castor, one of the two sailor-saving

themselves by afflicting them with greater and harsher misfortunes and diseases than other men suffer. All of us by nature share in death and disease, but to continue in such a bad state so long and to be unable every day to end one’s life by death befalls only those who have committed such sins as Cinesias has. One prefers not to close a discussion of these aspects of ancient Greek religion with the portrait of a man notoriously and exceptionally disrespectful of the gods, and fortunately we

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