Angelology: A Novel (Angelology Series)

Angelology: A Novel (Angelology Series)

Danielle Trussoni

Language: English

Pages: 496

ISBN: 0143118463

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Angelology: A Novel (Angelology Series)

Danielle Trussoni

Language: English

Pages: 496

ISBN: 0143118463

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


A thrilling epic about an ancient clash reignited in our time--between a hidden society and heaven's darkest creatures

There were giants in the earth in those days; and also after that, when the sons of God came in unto the daughters of men, and they bore children to them. --Genesis 6:5

Sister Evangeline was just a girl when her father entrusted her to the Franciscan Sisters of Perpetual Adoration in upstate New York. Now, at twenty-three, her discovery of a 1943 letter from the famous philanthropist Abigail Rockefeller to the late mother superior of Saint Rose Convent plunges Evangeline into a secret history that stretches back a thousand years: an ancient conflict between the Society of Angelologists and the monstrously beautiful descendants of angels and humans, the Nephilim.

For the secrets these letters guard are desperately coveted by the once-powerful Nephilim, who aim to perpetuate war, subvert the good in humanity, and dominate mankind. Generations of angelologists have devoted their lives to stopping them, and their shared mission, which Evangeline has long been destined to join, reaches from her bucolic abbey on the Hudson to the apex of insular wealth in New York, to the Montparnasse cemetery in Paris and the mountains of Bulgaria.

Rich in history, full of mesmerizing characters, and wondrously conceived, Angelology blends biblical lore, the myth of Orpheus and the Miltonic visions of Paradise Lost into a riveting tale of ordinary people engaged in a battle that will determine the fate of the world.

Promises (Syrenka, Book 1)

Treasury of Norse Mythology: Stories of Intrigue, Trickery, Love, and Revenge

Bloodtide

A Wild Swan: And Other Tales

The Pharaohs of Ancient Egypt

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

meters tall, a length that, in the ancient system of measurement the founding fathers had used, translated to 4.8 Roman cubits. Other than the golden ringlets falling about the shoulders, the body was completely hairless, and, to Dr. Seraphina’s delight—she had staked her professional reputation upon the very question—the creature had distinct sexual organs. The angel was male, as all the imprisoned Watchers had been. As Clematis’s account attested, one of the wings had been torn away and hung at

their branches. The driver slowed and turned into the Cimetière du Montparnasse, stopping before a great iron gate. He gave a short honk from the horn, and the gate opened, rattling aside as the car crawled forward. The interior of the cemetery was still and frozen, coated in ice that glimmered in the headlights, and I felt for a moment that this one shimmering place had been spared the ugliness and depravity of the war. The driver cut the engine before a statue of an angel perched upon a stone

woolen habits for those of lighter fabrics, a suggestion they did not take. As Evangeline turned to leave the office, Sister Philomena cleared her throat, a sign that she had not finished quite yet and that Evangeline should stay just a moment longer. Philomena said, “I have worked in the archives for many years, my child, and have weighed each request with great care. I have turned away many pesky researchers and writers and pseudo religious. It is a great responsibility to be the guardian at

happening. He stepped out of the car, following Gabriella toward the convent. “What are you doing?” she asked, eyeing him skeptically. “I’m going with you.” “I need to know you’re here waiting with the car. When I find Evangeline, we will need to leave very quickly. I’m depending upon you to make sure that will happen. Promise me you’ll stay here.” Without waiting for a response, Gabriella started off toward the convent, tucking the gun into a pocket of her long black jacket. Verlaine leaned

presence, not to mention my curiosity regarding the crates of notebooks, did not go unnoticed. Dr. Seraphina waved me into the room, asking me to close the door and join them. “Come in, Celestine,” she said again as she gestured for me to sit on a divan near the bookshelves. “I was wondering when you might arrive.” As if to second Dr. Seraphina’s remark, a grandfather clock at the far end of the office chimed eight o’clock. I was an hour early. “I thought we began at nine,” I said. “Gabriella

Download sample

Download