Apples of Uncommon Character: 123 Heirlooms, Modern Classics, and Little-Known Wonders

Apples of Uncommon Character: 123 Heirlooms, Modern Classics, and Little-Known Wonders

Rowan Jacobsen

Language: English

Pages: 175

ISBN: 2:00252841

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Apples of Uncommon Character: 123 Heirlooms, Modern Classics, and Little-Known Wonders

Rowan Jacobsen

Language: English

Pages: 175

ISBN: 2:00252841

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


In his classic A Geography of Oysters, Rowan Jacobsen forever changed the way America talks about its best bivalve. Now he does the same for our favorite fruit, showing us that there is indeed life beyond Red Delicious—and even Honeycrisp. While supermarkets limit their offerings to a few waxy options, apple trees with lives spanning human generations are producing characterful varieties—and now they are in the midst of a rediscovery. From heirlooms to new designer breeds, a delicious diversity of apples is out there for the eating.

Apples have strong personalities, ranging from crabby to wholesome. The Black Oxford apple is actually purple, and looks like a plum. The Knobbed Russet looks like the love child of a toad and a potato. (But don't be fooled by its looks.) The D'Arcy Spice leaves a hint of allspice on the tongue. Cut Hidden Rose open and its inner secret is revealed.

With more than 150 art-quality color photographs, Apples of Uncommon Character shows us the fruit in all its glory. Jacobsen collected specimens both common and rare from all over North America, selecting 120 to feature, including the best varieties for eating, baking, and hard-cider making. Each is accompanied by a photograph, history, lore, and a list of characteristics. The book also includes 20 recipes, savory and sweet, resources for buying and growing, and a guide to the best apple festivals. It's a must-have for every foodie.

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children, including Ellison’s Orange, Elstar, Fiesta, Freyberg, Golden Nugget, Holstein, James Grieve, Karmijn de Sonneville, Kidd’s Orange Red, Rosy Blenheim, SunCrisp, and Tydeman’s Late Orange. Its grandchildren include Gala, which is to Cox as Drew Barrymore is to John Barrymore. Empire Origin Geneva, New York, 1966. (Cross of McIntosh and Red Delicious.) Appearance A medium apple with deep, shiny red skin and a purple bloom, this Macoun lookalike is a greengrocer’s dream. Flavor Sweet

it almost always gets called Reine des Reinettes here. Most authorities believe they are one and the same apple. I’m not so sure. The ones I’ve seen, from the USDA orchard in Geneva, have a stunning orange glow to them, significantly different from the milk-paint red of the Reine des Reinettes. (Further confusion: King of the Pippins in England look nothing like what the USDA has in its database.) The flavor, however, is pretty close; both have loads of sweetness, acidity, and tropical aromatics.

Fuji, Granny Smith, McIntosh) came to dominate the late-twentieth-century market. Not long ago, three-quarters of the apples grown in America were Red Delicious, an apple bred for its intense red color at the expense of texture and taste. Every tree was genetically identical, monocropped on a massive scale in the sun-soaked (and irrigated) deserts of eastern Washington. American consumers brought this disaster upon themselves by consistently choosing the redder apple over the tastier one. As

sides. Full sun causes the Snow to burn brilliant crimson. The striking contrast of the lipstick-red skin and the whiter-than-white flesh feels like something out of a fairy tale. Sometimes the flesh is flecked with red—more Brothers Grimm than Disney. Flavor Mac-like but more tart and delicate, with a floral hint of white chocolate on the finish. Texture Tender when fully ripe, with unfortunately thick skin. Season Crisp and tart in early September; sweet and melting by late September. Use

a few hours.) 2.Make the pakoras: Combine the chickpea flour, baking powder, salt, garam masala, and cinnamon in a large bowl. 3.Add the water and mix well. The batter should have the consistency of pancakes or heavy cream. If it seems too thick, add more water. 4.Stir in the apples. 5.Heat the oil in a heavy skillet over medium heat. The oil needs to be at least 2 inches deep so the pakoras can float, and 3 inches is better. 6.When a pinch of flour sizzles as soon as it touches the oil, you

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