Arrested Development and Philosophy: They've Made a Huge Mistake

Arrested Development and Philosophy: They've Made a Huge Mistake

Language: English

Pages: 272

ISBN: 047057559X

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Arrested Development and Philosophy: They've Made a Huge Mistake

Language: English

Pages: 272

ISBN: 047057559X

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


A smart philosophical look at the cult hit television show, Arrested Development

Arrested Development earned six Emmy awards, a Golden Globe award, critical acclaim, and a loyal cult following—and then it was canceled. Fortunately, this book steps into the void left by the show's premature demise by exploring the fascinating philosophical issues at the heart of the quirky Bluths and their comic exploits. Whether it's reflecting on Gob's self-deception or digging into Tobias's double entendres, you'll watch your favorite scenes and episodes of the show in a whole new way.

  • Takes an entertaining look at the philosophical ideas and tensions in the show's plots and themes
  • Gives you new insights about the Bluth family and other characters: Is George Michael's crush on his cousin unnatural? Is it immoral for Lindsay to lie about stealing clothes to hide the fact that she has a job? Are the pictures really of bunkers or balls?
  • Lets you sound super-smart as you rattle off the names of great philosophers like Sartre and Aristotle to explain key characters and episodes of the show

Packed with thought-provoking insights, Arrested Development and Philosophy is essential reading for anyone who wants to know more about their late, lamented TV show. And it'll keep you entertained until the long-awaited Arrested Development movie finally comes out. (Whenever that is.)

Iron Man and Philosophy: Facing the Stark Reality (The Blackwell Philosophy and Pop Culture Series)

Žižek and Media Studies: A Reader

Psych and Philosophy: Some Dark Juju-Magumbo (Popular Culture and Philosophy)

Jeopardy! and Philosophy: What Is Knowledge in the Form of a Question (Popular Culture and Philosophy)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

fights—which were popular in Latin America—and sold copies under the name Boyfights. The Boyfights series included the titles “Boyfights: A Day in the Life of American Boys,” with bonus footage of Baby Buster in “I Don’t Want to Go to Bed”; “Boyfights 2: Boys Will Be Boys,” with bonus footage of Baby Buster in “Too Old to Breastfeed”; “A Boyfights Cookout,” featuring “Run for Your Life!” with bonus footage of Baby Buster in “A Fifth Grader Wets His Bed”; and “Backseat Boyfights: The Trip to Uncle

Finds the Fountain of Youth,” Vegas Pop, posted February 21, 2007, http://www.vegaspopular.com/2007/02/21/david-copperfield-found-the-fountain-of-youth-photos-exclusive/. 2. James Randi, Conjuring (New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1993), and Jim Steinmeyer, Hiding the Elephant: How Magicians Invented the Impossible and Learned to Disappear (New York: Carroll and Graf, 2003). 3. Glory Road, (1963). 4. Nicomachean Ethics, Book III, Chapter 1, 1103a32. 5. Gob is a prime example of the

treason against his country by building model homes, which aided an enemy. Just as he failed to be loyal to his family, George Sr.’s actions were disloyal to his country. The facts of the case bear this out. But political philosophy isn’t just interested in whether a particular act fails to meet the letter of the law. It’s also concerned with whether we ought to follow the law in the first place. Yes, George Sr. technically committed light treason, but why is that a bad thing? In order to

ambiguous character of the series. Whether the context is one of his numerous and quite public career failures, a romantic indiscretion, or a botched attempt to show up his brother Michael, the one line that we have come to expect most from Gob is “I’ve made a huge mistake.” While nearly everyone in the family utters the words, Gob has made them his catchphrase. Whereas other characters tend to learn from their mistakes, Gob never does. Gob is thus an interesting case study in the role of

moral. Buster’s courage in going to Iraq is really a cowardly avoidance of a deposition; Lucille’s adoption of Lindsay is just another competition with Stan Sitwell, Lindsay’s altruism is another form of self-assertion, and even Michael’s “keeping the family together” seems to be, in the end, just trying to do what his parents didn’t do. Our virtues, to paraphrase St. Augustine (354–430), are nothing but glittering vices. For Nietzsche, the “self-overcoming” that will create new values can

Download sample

Download