Battlestar Galactica and Philosophy: Knowledge Here Begins Out There

Battlestar Galactica and Philosophy: Knowledge Here Begins Out There

Jason T. Eberl

Language: English

Pages: 288

ISBN: 1405178140

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Battlestar Galactica and Philosophy: Knowledge Here Begins Out There

Jason T. Eberl

Language: English

Pages: 288

ISBN: 1405178140

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


This thought-provoking book examines the philosophical issues arising from the re-imagined Battlestar Galactica
television series, revealing how the ragtag fleet's outward journey to Earth is also an inward exploration for the human survivors and their Cylon pursuers.

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War Jerold J. Abrams The reimagined Battlestar Galactica boasts stronger roles for women, subtler politics, and more realistic special effects than the original BSG series. But the most important advance is the tension between humanity and the new humanoid Cylons, which mirrors our own coming relationship with a new race of artificial beings known as “posthumans.” Posthumans are artificially enhanced humans—or completely artificial beings—with unlimited lifespans and cognitive powers well beyond

that, right? Let’s keep it on me. Yeah, I’m married to a Cylon who walked through hell for all of us how many times? And she’s not half anything. Okay, how do we know there aren’t others like her? She made a choice. She’s a person. They’re a race of people. Wiping them out with a biological weapon is a crime against . . . is a crime against humanity. Helo and Sharon approach the Cylons becoming more than mere machines from a different angle than D’Anna, but the effect is the same. In order for

urgent and acute, isn’t just seeking neutral facts that could be discovered through introspection, empirical observation, or scientific investigation. No catalogue of facts can resolve the question of her identity, since the decisive issue concerns the meaning of those facts for her life. Considered from a first-person perspective, her identity concerns the eminently practical question of how she should live her life and relate to others with whom she must live. This dimension of personal

universe. It is not meaningful to ask what happened before the big bang; it is somewhat like asking what is north of the North Pole.5 But, to Aquinas and many others, this answer isn’t intellectually satisfying. A standard metaphysical axiom is ex nihilo nihil fit—“out of nothing, nothing comes.” This axiom alone supports the notion that something had to exist out of which the universe came to be—in other words, there must be a sufficient reason for the universe to exist at all. We can thus ask,

jive with our intuitions of what “being free” is all about, and also explain how we can be free in a deterministic or divinely predestined universe. A common redefinition of free will uses the concept of “agent causation,” which suggests that as long as the cause of an action is you, the agent, then the action is free—even if you couldn’t cause anything else at that moment but that particular action.10 This would explain why Boomer didn’t freely choose to shoot Commander Adama, but Starbuck did

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