Between Flesh and Steel: A History of Military Medicine from the Middle Ages to the War in Afghanistan

Between Flesh and Steel: A History of Military Medicine from the Middle Ages to the War in Afghanistan

Language: English

Pages: 312

ISBN: 1612344208

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Between Flesh and Steel: A History of Military Medicine from the Middle Ages to the War in Afghanistan

Language: English

Pages: 312

ISBN: 1612344208

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Over the last five centuries, the development of modern weapons and warfare has created an entirely new set of challenges for practitioners in the field of military medicine. Between Flesh and Steel traces the historical development of military medicine from the Middle Ages to modern times.
 
Military historian Richard A. Gabriel focuses on three key elements: the modifications in warfare and weapons whose increased killing power radically changed the medical challenges that battle surgeons faced in dealing with casualties, advancements in medical techniques that increased the effectiveness of military medical care, and changes that finally brought about the establishment of military medical care system in modern times. Others topics include the rise of the military surgeon, the invention of anesthesia, and the emergence of such critical disciplines as military psychiatry and bacteriology. The approach is chronological—century by century and war by war, including Iraq and Afghanistan—and cross-cultural in that it examines developments in all of the major armies of the West: British, French, Russian, German, and American. Between Flesh and Steel is the most comprehensive book on the market about the evolution of modern military medicine.

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Lutzen 1632: Climax of the Thirty Years War (Campaign, Volume 68)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

progress. Using the initial results as a base, an American Army doctor, Maj. Frederick F. Russell (1870–1960), modified the vaccine, and the first American attempt at vaccination for typhoid was tried in 1904. In 1909, the surgeon general ordered that the vaccine be tried on American troops. After administering twenty thousand vaccinations and observing the results, the American Army introduced compulsory vaccination for typhoid for all American recruits in 1911. Typhoid practically disappeared

amputations. The introduction of smokeless powder propelled rifle and artillery projectiles at higher velocities and greater distances than ever before. Shrapnel and exploding artillery shot caused 70 percent of battle wounds and produced mutilations on an unprecedented scale.66 Military medicine witnessed a number of important medical advances in treating the wounded. For the first time diagnostic bacteriology conducted in mobile laboratories was available in frontline hospitals. Improvements

soldier within the battle area. Moreover, these conditions have largely been extant for less than a hundred years. Tables 4 and 5 present data drawn from the mortality rates of those wounded in a number of wars who received treatment in military hospitals for their injuries. Table 4, which covers the Crimean War until the Northern Ireland Troubles, includes the mortality rates of patients with gunshot or high-explosive fragment wounds to the head. Table 5 shows data for patients from various

attend the sick within the garrison and in the hospitals, the first time that the physicians of nobles were placed at the regular disposal of the common soldier.53 Physicians were appointed to oversee the quality and distribution of the food supply. No one was permitted to eat fish, venison, or game birds for fear that they might carry disease.54 These efforts were so successful that not a single serious outbreak of disease occurred during the sixty-five-day siege. The siege of Metz is also

early as the 1740s, artillery gunners had various types of artillery rounds at their disposal. Howitzers primarily used heavy rounds that exploded on contact, and artillery guns with a flatter trajectory of fire used canister, chain, and grape-shot against cavalry and infantry formations. Later, these rounds were coupled with exploding charges that made it possible to burst artillery rounds over the enemy’s heads, considerably increasing lethality and casualties. During the American Civil War,

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