Beyond Postprocess and Postmodernism: Essays on the Spaciousness of Rhetoric

Beyond Postprocess and Postmodernism: Essays on the Spaciousness of Rhetoric

Jill McCracken

Language: English

Pages: 285

ISBN: B001QA4TBY

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Beyond Postprocess and Postmodernism: Essays on the Spaciousness of Rhetoric

Jill McCracken

Language: English

Pages: 285

ISBN: B001QA4TBY

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


In this collection of original essays, editors Theresa Enos and Keith D. Miller join their contributors--a veritable "who's who" in composition scholarship--in seeking to illuminate and complicate many of the tensions present in the field of rhetoric and composition. The contributions included here emphasize key issues in past and present work, setting the stage for future thought and study. The book also honors the late Jim Corder, a major figure in the development of the rhetoric and composition discipline. In the spirit of Corder's unfinished work, the contributors to this volume absorb, probe, stretch, redefine, and interrogate classical, modern, and postmodern rhetorics--and challenge their limitations.

Beyond Postprocess and Postmodernism: Essays on the Spaciousness of Rhetoric will be of interest to scholars, teachers, and students in rhetoric and composition, English, and communication studies. Offering a provocative discussion of postprocess composition theories and pedagogies and postmodern rhetorics, as well as the first thorough consideration of Jim Corder's contributions, this work is certain to influence the course of future study and research.

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What has he done to encourage or appreciate me? What a mess he is. How I have tried…. I can go on and on and guilt comes right along like my shadow. Can I avoid this? Can I be free of guilt? I do not think it is possible. Paul Tillich describes the anxiety of guilt as ontological. It transcends the subjective and the objective. It is a constant threat in caring. In caring, I am turned both outward (toward the other) and inward…when caring fails, I feel its loss. I want to care, but I do not. (38)

Composition—Edward Corbett, Gary Tate, Richard Larson, Lee Odell, Theresa Enos, George Yoos, Victor Vitanza, Wendy Bishop, and others—published his work in such journals as College English, Publication of the Modern Language Association, Quarterly Journal of Speech, PRE/TEXT, Rhetoric Review, and Freshman English News/Composition Studies, and in collections, Why did Corder both appeal to editors and then tend, as he wrote, to “disappear”?5 I suggest that this paradox stems from his reliance on a

to study war anymore. Or competition. Or manhood defined in those old terms” (28). Unfortunately, not everyone learned. Corder and Baumlin observe: “Sometimes we applaud Dirty Harry and Rambo. Sometimes we erect statues to John Wayne and elect his impersonators to the White House” (“Lamentations” 12). Corder laments that during the Gulf War, “The television news and the speeches and the magazines were just about as evasive as the movie and comic book and magazine versions of World War II” (“World

that when I speak, others will listen, and not just because I’m responding to a need or a thought that they already have. Perhaps I want to make a miracle, though I surely won’t. (“Hunting” 313) Not only does Corder push toward a broad register—working both ends against the middle—but he is also transparent about the development of his points and arguments. He is well aware of the effects of his own most pithy phrases or turns of thought, so he imports sentences, tropes, whole paragraphs from one

knowledge construction and to create inventional arts to guide that knowledgemaking process. From its beginning, the investigation of invention was inevitably entwined with conceptions of writing as a process. In 1964 Gordon Rohman and Albert Wlecke’s Prewriting: The Construction and Application of Models for Concept Formation in Writing articulated the issue at stake: A fundamental misconception which undermines so many of our best efforts in teaching writing: If we train students how to

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