Big Bowl Noodles and Rice: Fresh Asian Cooking From the Renowned Restaurant

Big Bowl Noodles and Rice: Fresh Asian Cooking From the Renowned Restaurant

Bruce Cost

Language: English

Pages: 148

ISBN: 0060194200

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Big Bowl Noodles and Rice: Fresh Asian Cooking From the Renowned Restaurant

Bruce Cost

Language: English

Pages: 148

ISBN: 0060194200

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


When the first Big Bowl restaurant opened in 1997, its founding partners had one mission: to make good, authentic Asian food accessible to American diners. Tired of greasy takeout and soggy egg rolls, they created an entirely different kind of Asian menu-one based on healthy techniques, market-fresh ingredients, and vibrant, traditional flavors. From steaming bowls of handmade noodles to fiery curries and fragrant stir-fries, every dish at Big Bowl became a delicious celebration of homestyle Chinese, Vietnamese, and Thai cooking.

Now Bruce Cost, the celebrated cook and a culinary partner behind Big Bowl's spectacular food, reveals how to prepare the house favorites in your own kitchen. Beginning with a basic explanation of Asian ingredients and cooking techniques, Cost's beautifully illustrated guide takes home cooks through the simple steps needed to create an Asian meal, whether it's a one-bowl dinner or a multicourse feast for family and friends. From Thai Chicken Noodle Salad to Blazing Big Rice Noodles with Beef to Shanghai Shrimp, all of Cost's recipes are incredibly flavorful yet easy enough for even the beginning cook to master. The instructions are clear, the ingredients are widely available, and the results are dramatic and delicious.

So if you think Asian food at home means little white boxes, think again. Big Bowl Noodles and Rice will show you how to bring the fresh, authentic flavors of Asia to your table any night of the week.

Hailed by Alice Waters as "one of the greatest cooks I have ever known," Bruce Cost is an award-winning restaurateur and chef, cooking teacher, and former food columnist for the San Francisco Chronicle. He currently serves as the culinary partner in Lettuce Entertain You's immensely popular chain of Big Bowl restaurants. Cost is also the author of Asian Ingredients, a comprehensive guide to Asian foodstuffs now available as a companion to this book.

 

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folded edge facing you, pull the bottom corners directly down, fold them over one another slightly, and pinch to seal. The resulting dumpling should look like a nurse’s cap. Repeat until filling has been used. Combine the sauce ingredients. Bring a large quantity of water to a boil. When rapidly boiling, add the wontons (not so much that the water will stop boiling, about 20), and cook for 3 to 4 minutes or until opaque. Remove, drain, and serve in individual bowls sprinkled with a small

and that the cured anchovy of today is an ancestor of that popular condiment. So we exploited this link between Southeast Asia and ancient Rome in this version of a Caesar by employing a Southeast Asian anchovy sauce called mam nem in place of the traditional anchovies. And we didn’t feel bad tampering with it given that, anchovies or not, Caesar salad is not exactly an ancient culinary icon, having been created about 30 years ago in L.A. The dressing below was created by Executive Chef Matt

a few drops of sesame oil. Serpes 2 as a complete meal, 3 to 4 as part of a larger meal Burmese Seafood Chow Fun This is a glorious, lightly curried broad noodle dish, with six kinds of fish and shellfish. Substitutes of course can be made: another fish for salmon, all clams instead of clams and mussels, etc. 12 ounces fresh Chow Fun rice noodles or one 7-ounce package ½-inch-wide dried rice noodles 1½ tablespoons fish sauce 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice 1 teaspoon sugar ½ cup

Packages (see recipe on page 118) Heat a small skillet over medium-high heat and add the salt, peppercorns, star anise, cassia, cloves, and cumin. Cook, shaking the pan until the spices begin to smoke. Remove the pan from the heat and allow to cool. Rub 2 tablespoons of this mixture over the chicken, inside and out, reserving the rest. Let sit for 3 hours. To make seasoned salt, pluck any remaining large spice pieces from the spice mixture (cassia, star anise, cloves), put them in a

Southeast Asian and some Chinese markets. Although any main ingredient can be used—shrimp, chicken, clams, etc.—this recipe yields a wonderfully flavored and attractive side dish for a larger meal. 1 cup black glutinous rice (optional, see directions) 1 teaspoon plus a pinch of salt 2 teaspoons sugar 3 cups cooked long-grain rice (3½ cups if black rice isn’t used) 1½ tablespoons fish sauce 1 tablespoon fresh lime juice 4 tablespoons peanut or vegetable oil ¾ cup chopped red onion 2

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