Blasphemy: New and Selected Stories

Blasphemy: New and Selected Stories

Sherman Alexie

Language: English

Pages: 480

ISBN: 0802121756

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Blasphemy: New and Selected Stories

Sherman Alexie

Language: English

Pages: 480

ISBN: 0802121756

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


"Alexie once again reasserts himself as one the most compelling contemporary practitioners of the short story. In Blasphemy, the author demonstrates his talent on nearly every page. . . . Will appeal to fans of Junot Diaz, George Saunders, and readers new to Alexie will find this enriching collection to be the perfect introduction to a formidable literary voice. . . . [Alexie] illuminates the lives of his characters in unique, surprising, and, ultimately, hopeful ways."—Boston Globe

"Told in [Alexie's] irreverent, unforgettable voice . . . You'll feel you've been transported inside the soul of a deeply wounded people. But they are a people too comfortable in their brown skins to allow those wounds to break them. . . . With irony and sardonic wit, the Native men and women in Alexie's imagination find a way forward, and they endure. . . . [A] great triumph."—Los Angeles Times

Sherman Alexie’s stature as a writer of stories, poetry, and novels has soared over the course of his twenty-book, twenty-year career. His wide-ranging, acclaimed fiction throughout the last two decades—from The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven to his most recent PEN/Faulkner Award–winning War Dances—have established him as a star in contemporary American literature.

A bold and irreverent observer of life among Native Americans in the Pacific Northwest, the daring, versatile, funny, and outrageous Alexie showcases his many talents in Blasphemy, where he unites fifteen beloved classics with sixteen new stories in one sweeping anthology for devoted fans and first-time readers. Included here are some of his most esteemed tales, including “What You Pawn I Will Redeem,” in which a homeless Indian man quests to win back a family heirloom; “This Is What It Means to Say Phoenix, Arizona,” a road-trip morality tale; “The Toughest Indian in the World,” about a night shared between a writer and a hitchhiker; and his most recent, “War Dances,” about a man grappling with sudden hearing loss in the wake of his father’s death. Alexie’s new stories are fresh and quintessential, about donkey basketball leagues, lethal wind turbines, a twenty-four-hour Asian manicure salon, good and bad marriages, and all species of warriors in America today.

An indispensable Alexie collection, Blasphemy reminds us, on every thrilling page, why Alexie is one of our greatest contemporary writers and a true master of the short story.

The Unsettling

The Complete Stories, Volume 2

Something Like Happy

Three Schemes and a Scandal (Writing Girls, Book 3.5)

Edie Kiglatuk's Christmas (Edie Kiglatuk Mystery, Book 1.5)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

he pushed through a sudden crowd of people and found himself witnessing a suicide. Illuminated by headlights, the jumper was a white woman, pretty, wearing a sundress and good shoes. Jeremiah could see that much as she stood on the bridge railing, forty feet above the cold water. He could hear sirens approaching from both sides of the bridge, but they would never make it through the traffic in time to save this woman. The jumper was screaming somebody’s name. Jeremiah stepped

back her regalia. I needed money, big money, so I left Junior and walked over to the Real Change office. 4:00 P.M. “Real Change is a multifaceted organization that publishes a newspaper, supports cultural projects that empower the poor and homeless, and mobilizes the public around poverty issues. Real Change’s mission is to organize, educate, and build alliances to create solutions to homelessness and poverty. They exist to provide a voice to poor people in our community.” I

cold and sleepy,” I said. “So I laid down.” “You dumb-ass, you passed out on the railroad tracks.” I sat up and looked around. I was lying on the railroad tracks. Dockworkers stared at me. I should have been a railroad-track pizza, a double Indian pepperoni with extra cheese. Sick and scared, I leaned over and puked whiskey. “What the hell’s wrong with you?” Officer Williams asked. “You’ve never been this stupid.” “It’s my grandmother,” I said. “She died.” “I’m sorry,

Chicken, and a ten-piece box of legs and wings only, along with a cooler filled with Diet Pepsi and store-bought potato salad and apples and bananas and potato chips and a chocolate cake. Harrison and Frank had fought over which particular basketball to bring, but they had at last agreed on an ABA red-white-and-blue rock. “Can’t you ever leave that ball at home?” Helen asked Harrison. She always asked him that question. After so many years of hard-worked marriage, that question had come to

outside, still alive.” We all laughed. “My husband bought one of those things,” she said. “Right from the airplane. He went on the in-flight Wi-Fi and ordered it at thirty thousand feet.” “I’ve never heard of anyone buying anything from SkyMall.” I said. “It’s so goofy.” And then I realized that I’d called her husband goofy. I wanted to pretend that I did it by accident, but no, I was competing for his wife’s attention. They’d been married for decades and I was flirting with

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