Blind Eye: The Terrifying Story Of A Doctor Who Got Away With Murder

Blind Eye: The Terrifying Story Of A Doctor Who Got Away With Murder

James B. Stewart

Language: English

Pages: 336

ISBN: 0684865637

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Blind Eye: The Terrifying Story Of A Doctor Who Got Away With Murder

James B. Stewart

Language: English

Pages: 336

ISBN: 0684865637

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


A medical thriller from Pulitzer Prize–winning author James B. Stewart about serial killer doctor Michael Swango and the medical community that chose to turn a blind eye on his criminal activities.

No one could believe that the handsome young doctor might be a serial killer. Wherever he was hired—in Ohio, Illinois, New York, South Dakota—Michael Swango at first seemed the model physician. Then his patients began dying under suspicious circumstances.

At once a gripping read and a hard-hitting look at the inner workings of the American medical system, Blind Eye describes a professional hierarchy where doctors repeatedly accept the word of fellow physicians over that of nurses, hospital employees, and patients—even as horrible truths begin to emerge. With the prodigious investigative reporting that has defined his Pulitzer Prize–winning career, James B. Stewart has tracked down survivors, relatives of victims, and shaken coworkers to unearth the evidence that may finally lead to Swango’s conviction.

Combining meticulous research with spellbinding prose, Stewart has written a shocking chronicle of a psychopathic doctor and of the medical establishment that chose to turn a blind eye on his criminal activities.

Day of the Guns (Tiger Mann, Book 1)

The Secret Poisoner: A Century of Murder

Who Killed Palomino Molero?

One Night with Nora (Michael Shayne, Book 23)

The Grass Widow's Tale (Felse, Book 7)

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nearly ten months before, Swango had already obtained two new positions as a physician. The first was at University Teaching Hospital in Lusaka, the capital of Zambia, the African nation which lies to the north of Zimbabwe and east of Angola. He had obtained a temporary medical license from the Zambian government and had been treating patients for over two months when Zimbabwe authorities issued an alert on him to other southern African nations, including South Africa, Namibia, Botswana, and

letter of recommendation from Dr. Wacaser, the neurosurgeon who had been his mentor, which he sent to about ten teaching hospitals. Wacaser inscribed a handwritten addendum to each copy of the letter—“He’ll really do a good job for you”—the only time Wacaser had gone to such lengths for one of his students. Much as they do in applying to medical school, graduating medical students apply for internships and residencies through the Association of American Medical Colleges in Washington, D.C.,

heard that Swango had been cleared. Moore was about to dispose of the thing, but for some reason she hesitated. She turned to another nurse and said she was going to throw the syringe away. “Do you think it’s okay?” “Well, sure,” the nurse replied. “It’s gone now. It’s over with.” Moore dropped the syringe into a waste container. IN July Swango moved back to his hometown of Quincy, as he had during other intervals in his career. He told his mother and relatives that he hadn’t liked the

had been accepted to another residency program and would be working in a hospital, it said nothing about the medical school’s investigation of him or about the reopening of the case by Morgan’s office in 1985. It did not send either the Meeks or Morgan reports, both documents of public record. Instead, an associate to Tzagournis at Ohio State replied that both Swango and the University of South Dakota would have to “execute waivers and hold-harmless agreements” before Ohio State would release any

stress she was living under. Then, on January 13, Kristin became violently ill in the lobby of a local clinic. She experienced intense nausea, headache, and disorientation, and she passed out when she got home. These are the classic symptoms of arsenic poisoning. Though Kristin never expressed any suspicion that she was being poisoned, she was feeling increasingly desperate, and as if she had nowhere to turn. She began confiding her thoughts to a written journal. The first entry is dated

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