Blood of Spain: An Oral History of the Spanish Civil War

Blood of Spain: An Oral History of the Spanish Civil War

Ronald Fraser

Language: English

Pages: 741

ISBN: 0712660143

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Blood of Spain: An Oral History of the Spanish Civil War

Ronald Fraser

Language: English

Pages: 741

ISBN: 0712660143

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Publish Year note: First published in 1979 by Pantheon

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We discover what civil war, revolution and counter-revolution actually felt like from inside both camps. The contours of the war take shape through the words of the eyewitnesses. The atmosphere of events is vividly recaptured. And though the lived experience of the participants is revealed the uniquely tragic essence of all civil war.

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communist party organized a number of women’s organizations, including the Anti-Fascist Women’s Organization, the Union of Young Mothers, the Girls’ Union, etc. 16. See pp. 132–5. Carod’s column liberated Beceite on its march towards Saragossa in the first weeks of the war. Carod became a commissar and later the division’s political commissar. 17. The traditional formal male request to be accepted by the woman as her suitor. Militancies 9 MIGUEL NUÑEZ FUE-JSU education militiaman The change

pleasure.’ The machine broke in its fall on the air raid shelter we’d just left, but I picked up the head, and I’ve got it still … As her eldest daughter, Manolita, came out of the shelter on the edge of the town – where none of the industrial plants, including the small-arms factory, had been hit – a wave of heat struck her face. She told a man that she had to join her parents who were in the blazing ruins she could see beyond the railway station. Together, they skirted the town along the

latter, as we have seen, narrowly rejected joining Basque home rule in 1931. Use of Basque had been gradually declining in Navarre and was concentrated mainly in the mountainous north where the peasantry supported nationalism. But where the peasantry was self-sufficient or relatively prosperous as in other areas of Navarre, it tended to Carlism. On the extensive estates along the Ebro in south-eastern Navarre, the agricultural workers joined the UGT or CNT.48 The Carlists by and large rejected

Félix, teacher (CNT–FAI), Catalonia/Aragon, 107, 111, 112, 138, 366, 393 Casariego, Jesús-Evaristo, student (Carlist), Asturias, 249, 252, 254, 523–4 Casas,* Petra, garment worker (PCE), Madrid, 290 Castaño, Ernesto, parliamentary deputy (CEDA) [M], Salamanca, 85–6, 408, 414–16, 517, 530 Castilla del Pino, Carlos, student, Andalusia, 65, 155 Castro,* Manuel, baker’s son, Andalusia, 130–31 Cebrián, Florentín, day labourer, Aragon, 356 Cercos, Josep, metalworker (CNT–FIJL), Catalonia/Aragon,

Basque country. Spain was not one country but a number of countries and regions marked by their uneven historical development.5 From the turn of the century, however, there had been a significant advance in industrial development. It was aided by an economic boom during the First World War, in which Spain remained neutral, and the world boom of the 1920s. ‘By 1930 Spain was halfway on the road to capitalist development.’6 A new factor began to make its political presence felt: the proletariat.

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