Brill's Companion to Callimachus (Brill's Companions in Classical Studies)

Brill's Companion to Callimachus (Brill's Companions in Classical Studies)

Luigi Lehnus, Susan Stephens

Language: English

Pages: 71

ISBN: 9004156739

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Brill's Companion to Callimachus (Brill's Companions in Classical Studies)

Luigi Lehnus, Susan Stephens

Language: English

Pages: 71

ISBN: 9004156739

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Few figures from Greco-Roman antiquity have undergone as much reassessment in recent decades as Callimachus of Cyrene, who was active at the Alexandrian court of the Ptolemies during the early third century BC. Once perceived as a supreme example of ivory tower detachment and abstruse learning, Callimachus has now come to be understood as an artificer of the images of a powerful and vibrant court and as a poet second only to Homer in his later reception.For the modern audience, the fragmentation of his texts and the diffusion of source materials has often impeded understanding his poetic achievement. Brills Companion to Callimachus has been designed to aid in negotiating this scholarly terrain, especially the process of editing and collecting his fragments, to illuminate his intellectual and social contexts, and to indicate the current directions that his scholarship is taking.

Russian Winter

Riacho Doce

Bosnian Chronicle: A Novel

The Frequency of Souls: A Novel

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

vaulted ceiling, somehow magnetized so that a statue of the dead queen could be seen to levitate (apparently attracted by the iron in her hair). A dedication “to the Canopic god” in Epigram 55 Pf. (= 16 GP) must refer to the temple that Ptolemy III and Berenice II dedicated to Serapis at Canopus.22 Another epigram (Ep. 37 Pf. = 17 GP), describing a dedication to Serapis by a Cretan from Lyctus, most likely refers to the same Canopic shrine of Serapis, or perhaps to the Serapeum in Alexandria.

conversation with the Muses disappears. The elegies are now separate from one another, without explicit connections. Proof of this is seen in the fact that, when papyri contain the end of one aition and the beginning of the next, we find no narrative transitions.19 This differing narrative strategy in the last two books distinguishes them markedly from the first two and greatly influences the planning and development of the single elegies. The overall structure of Books 3 and 4 can be more easily

the Locrian]) refer to Panhellenic games, the Nemean and the Olympic, respectively (Fantuzzi and Hunter 2004: 46–47). The first line of Book 4 (4.1) apparently refers simultaneously to the Epilogue (4.19), to the beginning of Book 3 (3.1, The Victory of Berenice), and to the Prologue of the Aetia (1.1).32 Furthermore, in the Epilogue (4.19) Callimachus mentions first the Graces and then the Heliconian Muses, deliberately reversing the order chosen at the beginning of the Aetia, where he speaks

philological work Miscellanea (published in 1489).4 This encounter between two spiritus magni was neither fortuitous nor occasional: after brilliantly detecting and patiently picking out— from epigrams, ancient scholia (to Apollonius Rhodius, to Aratus, and to Callimachus’ own Hymns), Latin authors (Catullus, Pliny the Elder, Statius, Hyginus, Apuleius, and especially Ovid), and Byzantine lexica (e.g. the Suda)—various items of information concerning the Hecale and The Lock of Berenice (see

papyri of the late fourth century ad: see Luppe 1985: 94–96 and 103. 87 See Wilamowitz 1921: 198–200, Diehl 1937: 445–446; an updated overview of the problem in G. Ucciardello’s article in the Lessico dei grammatici greci antichi. Sallustius may be the same grammarian who also wrote hypomnemata to Herodotus and Demosthenes. (See Suda σ 60.) On him, see also Pfeiffer 1949–53: 2.xxviii–ix. 88 Hecker’s law has been confirmed by the papyrological finds, except for a few cases that can mostly be

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