Building Microservices

Building Microservices

Sam Newman

Language: English

Pages: 280

ISBN: 1491950358

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Building Microservices

Sam Newman

Language: English

Pages: 280

ISBN: 1491950358

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Distributed systems have become more fine-grained in the past 10 years, shifting from code-heavy monolithic applications to smaller, self-contained microservices. But developing these systems brings its own set of headaches. With lots of examples and practical advice, this book takes a holistic view of the topics that system architects and administrators must consider when building, managing, and evolving microservice architectures.

Microservice technologies are moving quickly. Author Sam Newman provides you with a firm grounding in the concepts while diving into current solutions for modeling, integrating, testing, deploying, and monitoring your own autonomous services. You’ll follow a fictional company throughout the book to learn how building a microservice architecture affects a single domain.

  • Discover how microservices allow you to align your system design with your organization’s goals
  • Learn options for integrating a service with the rest of your system
  • Take an incremental approach when splitting monolithic codebases
  • Deploy individual microservices through continuous integration
  • Examine the complexities of testing and monitoring distributed services
  • Manage security with user-to-service and service-to-service models
  • Understand the challenges of scaling microservice architectures

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functionality out of the box to help with service discovery compared to some of the newer alternatives. That said, it is certainly tried and tested, and widely used. The underlying algorithms Zookeeper implements are quite hard to get right. I know one database vendor, for example, that was using Zookeeper just for leader election in order to ensure that a primary node got properly promoted during failure conditions. The client felt that Zookeeper was too heavyweight and spent a long time ironing

other operations like compensating transactions, and a way to monitor and manage these more complex concepts in your system. For example, you might create the idea of an “in-process-order” that gives you a natural place to focus all logic around processing the order end to end (and dealing with exceptions). Reporting As we’ve already seen, in splitting a service into smaller parts, we need to also potentially split up how and where data is stored. This creates a problem, however, when it

things manageable, which is one more thing you’ll have to handle to ensure that the development and test experience is a good one. Linux Containers For Linux users, there is an alternative to virtualization. Rather than having a hypervisor to segment and control separate virtual hosts, Linux containers instead create a separate process space in which other processes live. On Linux, processes are run by a given user, and have certain capabilities based on how the permissions are set.

react and adapt, rather than it being a never-changing artifact. Thus, our architects need to shift their thinking away from creating the perfect end product, and instead focus on helping create a framework in which the right systems can emerge, and continue to grow as we learn more. Although I have spent much of the chapter so far warning you off comparing ourselves too much to other professions, there is one analogy that I like when it comes to the role of the IT architect and that I think

better encapsulates what we want this role to be. Erik Doernenburg first shared with me the idea that we should think of our role more as town planners than architects for the built environment. The role of the town planner should be familiar to any of you who have played SimCity before. A town planner’s role is to look at a multitude of sources of information, and then attempt to optimize the layout of a city to best suit the needs of the citizens today, taking into account future use. The way

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