Cannabis: Evolution and Ethnobotany

Cannabis: Evolution and Ethnobotany

Language: English

Pages: 456

ISBN: 0520292480

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Cannabis: Evolution and Ethnobotany

Language: English

Pages: 456

ISBN: 0520292480

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Cannabis: Evolution and Ethnobotany is a comprehensive, interdisciplinary exploration of the natural origins and early evolution of this famous plant, highlighting its historic role in the development of human societies. Cannabis has long been prized for the strong and durable fiber in its stalks, its edible and oil-rich seeds, and the psychoactive and medicinal compounds produced by its female flowers. The culturally valuable and often irreplaceable goods derived from cannabis deeply influenced the commercial, medical, ritual, and religious practices of cultures throughout the ages, and human desire for these commodities directed the evolution of the plant toward its contemporary varieties. As interest in cannabis grows and public debate over its many uses rises, this book will help us understand why humanity continues to rely on this plant and adapts it to suit our needs.

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Diamond Sutra, reputed to be the first (868 ce) book printed on fine paper. This manuscript and many others appear to have been made of hemp pulp paper, apparently the first paper to be used widely by the Chinese (e.g., Pan 1979; Shimura 1980). Thousands of artifacts, including large numbers of ancient Chinese texts, were removed from Mogao and taken to various foreign countries by a series of British, French, Japanese, and Russian explorers. Many thousands of Buddhist manuscript scrolls remained

admiration the construction of ships of many kinds; for example, he tells us how the cracks between nailed siding planks are caulked (sealed or waterproofed): They are not pitched with pitch, because they have not of it in those regions, but they oil them in such a way as I shall tell you, because they have another thing which seems FIGURE 20.   Raw Chinese hemp fiber (top left) is combed, carded, and bleached to produce fiber (center) for spinning yarn (top right), which is used to weave

important Korean books (KCNA 2007). During the Silla Kingdom (57 bce to 668 ce) farmers produced hemp fiber to be woven into fabric for a variety of uses (Choi 1971), and Suh (2008) discusses the ancient traditional textile use of hemp fibers during the Paekje Kingdom (18 bce to 660 ce) in southern Korea. Since ancient times in Korea, hemp cloth has been classified based on its 148  HISTORY OF CANNABIS USE FOR FIBER thread count, color, production area, and use. Fine, high yarn count hemp

years ago.” These people were very distinctive in that they “used nets, rather than speed and might, to capture vast numbers of hares, foxes, and other mammals” (Pringle 1997). If this interpretation is valid, it suggests that the Gravettian people were among the first known net hunters, and this could explain why the Gravettian culture is characterized by bigger more settled human populations. James Adovasio, an expert on prehistoric fiber technology, identified cordage imprints on four

an ancient archeological site located on the Talgar alluvial fan (Chang et al. 2003); the site is believed to be a hearth associated with the Saka people dated to the Iron Age (775 bce to 100 ce). The Saka can be described as eastern variants of Scythian populations who were supported by a dual economy based on farming and herding livestock from one grazing ground to another in a seasonal cycle between lowlands in winter and highlands in summer. Arlene Rosen (2000) studied the phytoliths

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