Captain America and the Struggle of the Superhero: Critical Essays

Captain America and the Struggle of the Superhero: Critical Essays

Language: English

Pages: 243

ISBN: 0786437030

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Captain America and the Struggle of the Superhero: Critical Essays

Language: English

Pages: 243

ISBN: 0786437030

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


For more than 60 years, Captain America was one of Marvel Comics' flagship characters, representing truth, strength, liberty, and justice. The assassination of his alter ego, Steve Rogers, rocked the comic world, leaving numerous questions about his life and death. This book discusses topics including the representation of Nazi Germany in Captain America Comics from the 1940s to the 1960s; the creation of Captain America in light of the Jewish American experience; the relationship between Captain America and UK Marvel's Captain Britain; the groundbreaking partnership between Captain America and African American superhero the Falcon; and the attempts made to kill the character before his "real" death.

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Toro from fiendish death traps. The covers almost never matched the stories inside, so Thomas would write stories to match those cover scenes, even if they were factually deficient. For instance, the cover of AllSelect 1 (Fall 1943) showed the heroes storming a medieval castle with a banner identifying it as “Hitler’s Berchtesgaden.” Although the real Berchtesgaden was a 20th century villa, Thomas had it drawn to match the old cover, explaining his rationale in the letters column of 20 (Sept.

morning of the Pearl Harbor attack. President Roosevelt had called in Plastic Man, here an FBI agent, to brief the heroes on their missing comrades. Also attending were non–JSA members Johnny Quick (a Flash clone), Liberty Belle, and Robotman. FDR asked the group to mobilize an “All-Star Squadron” of every “mystery man” available to bolster the country’s defense. The abductor of the JSA members was Per Degaton, a time-traveling villain from 1947, The Invaders and the All-Star Squadron

the fact that the U.S. Army he is serving in was itself segregated. The vast majority of black troops had separate training facilities and fought in segregated combat units; even blood supplies were separated by race (Osher 239; Adkins 585). Even as comic book creators attempted to create a more realistic depiction of the past, they sometimes failed to address major issues, such as the racism of the U.S. armed forces during World War II, making these same comics historically inaccurate. Gray is

the character continue on the same track in future books? It’s hard to say. But it’s almost certain this Cap is “Ultimate” in name only. References Brubaker, Ed, Steve Epting, and Michael Lark, et al. Captain America 3, Vol. 5. New York: Marvel, 2005. Millar, Mark, Bryan Hitch, and Andrew Currie, et al. The Ultimates 1, Vol. 1. New York: Marvel, 2002. _____. The Ultimates 12, Vol. 1. New York: Marvel, 2002. _____. The Ultimates 3, Vol. 1. New York: Marvel, 2002. _____. The Ultimates 9, Vol. 1.

that of artistic, or otherwise representational practices, that are disseminated to inform subjects and legitimate the material practices described initially. An example of this, again chosen to fit the example of the nation-state system, would be the aforementioned world political map, which elides all sense of socio-cultural difference except for that constructed through one’s location on one side of a border or another. Thus, all three acts of creation, although nominally separate, interact to

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