China Goes Global: The Partial Power

China Goes Global: The Partial Power

Language: English

Pages: 432

ISBN: 0199361037

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

China Goes Global: The Partial Power

Language: English

Pages: 432

ISBN: 0199361037

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Most global citizens are well aware of the explosive growth of the Chinese economy. Indeed, China has famously become the "workshop of the world." Yet, while China watchers have shed much light on the country's internal dynamics--China's politics, its vast social changes, and its economic development--few have focused on how this increasingly powerful nation has become more active and assertive throughout the world.

In China Goes Global, eminent China scholar David Shambaugh delivers the book that many have been waiting for--a sweeping account of China's growing prominence on the international stage. Thirty years ago, China's role in global affairs beyond its immediate East Asian periphery was decidedly minor and it had little geostrategic power. Today however, China's expanding economic power has allowed it to extend its reach virtually everywhere--from mineral mines in Africa, to currency markets in the West, to oilfields in the Middle East, to agribusiness in Latin America, to the factories of East Asia. Shambaugh offers an enlightening look into the manifestations of China's global presence: its extensive commercial footprint, its growing military power, its increasing cultural influence or "soft power," its diplomatic activity, and its new prominence in global governance institutions.

But Shambaugh is no alarmist. In this balanced and well-researched volume, he argues that China's global presence is more broad than deep and that China still lacks the influence befitting a major world power--what he terms a "partial power." He draws on his decades of China-watching and his deep knowledge of the subject, and exploits a wide variety of previously untapped sources, to shed valuable light on China's current and future roles in world affairs.

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737 Andrew Moody, “Chinese Take the Art Market by Storm,” op cit. 738 Souren Melikian, “A Shifting Balance of Power,” op cit. 739 “The Art Market Becomes Truly Global, Reveals New TEFAF Report,” Art Daily, March 8, 2010, http://www.artdaily.org/index.asp?int_sec=11&int_new=29061. For an interesting assessment of the Chinese domestic art market, and its development from 2000– 2008, see Lin Ercai, “2008 nian Zhongguo wenwu yishipin shichang fazhan baogao” [2008 Report on China’s Cultural relics

Central Committee (中央外事办公厅) that oversees China’s foreign policy for the national leadership. Not much is known publicly about this organ, but some Chinese publications and the author’s interviews with FAO deputy directors shed some light on its operations.145 The FAO was originally established at the same time as the FALSG in 1958 but was dissolved by “executive order” in 1970, before being resurrected in 1982. After its reinstatement, the FAO was administratively switched under the State

Council, until it reverted to the Central Committee in 1998. One study notes six functions of the FAO: to carry out investigations and research, and raise (foreign) policy suggestions; to make and revise documents and laws related to foreign affairs work on the national, provincial, and municipal levels; to be responsible for overseeing organizations involved in foreign propaganda work (对外宣传工作)146 ; to organize meetings and prepare documents for the FALSG, and ensure implementation of decisions

wary of Washington—and Washington is keeping a close eye on China’s activities in the region. Even though the Monroe Doctrine has been consigned to history, Washington continues to view the region as its “backyard” and keeps a close eye on China’s multidimensional thrust into the region. Beijing is aware of this and has gone out of its way not to establish a military presence in the region or draw too close to certain regimes. For example, it has kept its distance from the Chavez regime in

in Asia calling out for multinational collaboration, it is this one.359 To deal with its pervasive environmental degradation, China is taking a number of proactive steps. The first dimension is legal and regulatory. Since the passage of the first Environmental Protection Law in 1979, China has passed more than forty environmental protection laws and a large number of state regulations.360 In 2007, the National Development and Reform Commission of the State Council enacted the National Climate

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