Chinese Cookery Secrets: How to Cook Chinese Restaurant Food at Home

Chinese Cookery Secrets: How to Cook Chinese Restaurant Food at Home

Language: English

Pages: 192

ISBN: B00DSP8UTM

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Chinese Cookery Secrets: How to Cook Chinese Restaurant Food at Home

Language: English

Pages: 192

ISBN: B00DSP8UTM

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Deh-Ta Hsiung shares his life-long knowledge of Chinese restaurant cooking to help you successfully reproduce your favourite meals at home - from a simple, single dish to an elaborate, grand feast. In a clear, straightforward style, he vividly reveals the elusive secrets that produce perfection.

He shows you each crucial stage of preparation to enable you to recreate the harmonious blending of subtle flavours, delicate textures, aromas, colours and shapes that are the hallmarks of authentic Chinese restaurant cooking.

This updated version of Chinese Cookery Secrets contains recipes for dishes as diverse as 'Smoked' Chicken, Deep-Fried Squid and delicious Iron-Place Sizzled meat and fish dishes, sure to be a wonderful centerpiece for any dinner party, to takeaway staples like Egg Fried Rice and Sweet and Sour Chicken.

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restaurants and food manufacturers. He is also a tutor of international renown – he was a regular teacher at the late Ken Lo’s Chinese Cookery School in London between 1981 and 1996, and he taught in many other institutes all over the UK and at the Ballymaloe Cookery School in County Cork, Ireland on several occasions, as well as in France, Italy, Finland and as far away as India, where he was sent by the UN to conduct several courses in the country’s leading catering institutes. Several of

hot. STIR-FRIED SCALLOPS WITH VEGETABLES Serves 4. Preparation & cooking time: 25–30 mins. Fresh scallops without their shells are quite inexpensive. But remember that the delicate flavour and texture will be lost if you overcook them. 6–8 fresh scallops � egg white 2 teaspoons thick cornflour paste (see page 40) about 300ml (½ pint) seasoned oil (see page 44) 1 spring onion, cut into short sections 3–4 small bits of fresh ginger root 50g (2oz) Chinese leaves, cut into small pieces

people in the north had to rely more on wheat products for their everyday meals. As mentioned on page 33, the Chinese word fan covers all the staples (rice and wheat products, which includes noodles, pancakes and dumplings, etc). In everyday usage, the Chinese word for ‘rice’ and ‘meal’ are the same – just as in English the word ‘bread’ is used in ‘the breadwinner’ or ‘give us our daily bread’. Plain boiled or steamed rice is served for everyday meals, while fried rice and noodles (fried or in

from warping. Nowadays it is possible to obtain split-free wood block, as well as plastic chopping board made of white acrylic, which will not split, smell or warp. But they lack the aesthetic appeal of a traditional tree trunk with its beautiful pattern of grains. If you already have a large, rectangular board of hard wood, at least 5cm (2") thick, then it should take the heaviest blows from a cleaver. Use one side for chopping only, then the other side should remain smooth enough for general

or peeled; these are not really suitable for Chinese cooking. Try to get the uncooked variety known as king or tiger prawns, frozen when fresh, either in their shells and headless, or shelled. They should always be thoroughly defrosted and de-veined before use (see page 127). Red bean paste This reddish-brown paste is made from puréed red beans and crystallized sugar. Sold in cans, the leftover contents should be transferred to a covered container and will keep in the refrigerator for several

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