Clarkesworld Issue 77

Clarkesworld Issue 77

Neil Clarke, Erzebet YellowBoy, Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam, Greg Kurzawa

Language: English

Pages: 58

ISBN: 0615813976

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Clarkesworld Issue 77

Neil Clarke, Erzebet YellowBoy, Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam, Greg Kurzawa

Language: English

Pages: 58

ISBN: 0615813976

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Clarkesworld is a Hugo Award-winning science fiction and fantasy magazine. Each month they publish a mix of original fiction, articles, interviews and art.

This issue features the following stories: "Gravity" by Erzebet YellowBoy, "The Wanderers" by Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam and "Vacant Spaces" by Greg Kurzawa. Non-fiction includes an interview with Karen Lord, an article on SF and Social Media by Mark Cole, an Another Word column by Daniel Abraham and an editorial by Neil Clarke.

Night of Denial: Stories and Novellas (European Classics)

Grimoire of the Lamb (Prequel to The Iron Druid Chronicles)

Clarkesworld, Issue 68 (May 2012)

Great Short Works of Herman Melville (Perennial Classics)

The Demon in the Wood (The Grisha, Book 0.1)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

those days will be spent collecting data. Very few of those days have anything to do with the sun. None of us have ever seen the sun, not with our own eyes. We are quite excited. Captain Verma is anxious to depart. She does not like long-winded ceremonies, and she hates the word goodbye. Captain Ahab is happy to shake hands and play the star during these last moments. He is a very social man. Hijo and I stand back and let him get on with it. FC Durant smiles when she needs to, but we who know

mind. Perhaps the furthest extrapolation of the idea to date appears in Hannu Rajaniemi’s The Quantum Thief ( 2012): in a radically transformed society on Mars, everyone’s thoughts are permanently linked to the collective consciousness, and some people have developed new organs to isolate themselves from it. Ultimately, Social Media remains a somewhat uncomfortable fit for SF: the whole notion of SF brings to mind far more heroic visions of the future, built on some wild-eyed extrapolation from

while struggling with a sequel to her award-winning debut, Redemption in Indigo, which was a re-imagining of a Senegalese folktale. “Most SF readers detect that Redemption in Indigo is influenced by another literary tradition,” said Lord, who was born in Barbados. “ The Best of All Possible Worlds is sci-fi familiar, maybe too familiar, and genre readers will have expectations. I am a West Indian writer; my purpose and my style are different in ways that aren’t always apparent. There will be

ship could fly on its own.” “But the data,” I begin to say. She cuts me off. “The people back home need heroes. We are here to keep the fires burning, nothing more. You know how it goes.” No, I don’t. Durant drifts off and I immediately reach out for Hijo. He has heard the conversation, I can tell. “Do you think it’s true?” I ask him. “Does it matter?” he says. He has a wistful look on his face, as though he is thinking the same things I am. Opportunities lost. Friends forsaken. Love never

much of the technology itself was lost. In many ways, our ancestors had to start again. Our ship is a result of two hundred years of painstaking research and cautious allocation of resources. The theory is a simple one: if we can decrease the core’s hydrogen, we will increase the output of energy from the sun. It seems outrageous to me, but I was not trained in these things. I was trained to read numbers and codes, to withstand solitude and a lack of gravity, to eat composite foods, and to wear a

Download sample

Download