Clinical Neuropsychological Foundations of Schizophrenia (American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology/Psychology Press Continuing Education Series)

Clinical Neuropsychological Foundations of Schizophrenia (American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology/Psychology Press Continuing Education Series)

Language: English

Pages: 368

ISBN: 1848728778

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Clinical Neuropsychological Foundations of Schizophrenia (American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology/Psychology Press Continuing Education Series)

Language: English

Pages: 368

ISBN: 1848728778

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Clinical Neuropsychological Foundations of Schizophrenia is the first practitioner-oriented source of information on the neuropsychology of schizophrenia. This volume demonstrates the growth in what is known about cognition in schizophrenia, its assessment, and how this informs clinical practice.

It provides the practicing clinical neuropsychologist, and other professionals working with persons with schizophrenia, with the knowledge and tools they need to provide competent professional neuropsychological services. It includes an overview of developmental models of schizophrenia and its associated neuropathologies, so that the clinician can fully understand how vulnerability and progression of the disorder influence brain development and functioning, and how cognition and functioning are associated with these changes. In addition, the volume covers contemporary evidence-based assessment and interventions, including cognitive remediation and other cognitive oriented interventions. Throughout, the research findings are synthesized to make them clinically relevant to clinical neuropsychologists working in outpatient or inpatient psychiatric settings.

The book is an invaluable resource for practicing professional neuropsychologists, clinical psychologists, psychiatrists, and neuropsychiatrists, as well as graduate students of these disciplines, interns, and postdoctoral residents and fellows who work with schizophrenic patients.

Emotional Unavailability: Recognizing It, Understanding It, Avoiding Its Trap

Healing the Wounded Heart

E-Therapy for Substance Abuse and Co-Morbidity (SpringerBriefs in Social Work)

Madness: A History

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Drug abuse, especially stimulant and cannabis abuse, is associated with an earlier age of onset of schizophrenia (Barnes, Mutsatsa, Hutton, Watt, & Joyce, 2006; Leeson, Harrison, Ron, Barnes, & Joyce, 2011; Mueser et al., 1990; Salyers & Mueser, 2001; Sugranyes et al., 2009; Tsuang, Simpson, & Kronfol, 1982). Individuals who develop schizophrenia following drug abuse tend to have a stronger family history of psychosis than people with a drug use disorder only (Tsuang et al., 1982; Vardy & Kay,

cognitive symptoms is equivocal. It is also important to reiterate that reducing psychotic symptoms is not sufficient to improve overall functioning. While patients may be in less distress when their positive symptoms are controlled, studies have found no significant relationship between levels of positive symptoms and functional outcomes in schizophrenia (Green, 1996; Green, Kern, Braff, & Mintz, 2000). When psychotic symptoms have been successfully reduced, cognitive functioning still

al., 2008). Clinician-Rated Measures of Outcome The advantage of scales that are clinician-rated and use client or informant report is that they generate information on aspects of client life that only the client has access to. These reports may also provide a more accurate assessment of what the client is actually achieving in their community than performance-based measures. However, lack of insight, a key feature of the illness, can make clients’ assessment of their own levels of

Schizophrenia Bulletin, 27(2), 235–245. Patterson, T. L., Moscona, S., McKibbin, C. L., Davidson, K., & Jeste, D.V . (2001b). Social skills performance assessment among older patients with schizophrenia. Schizophrenia Research, 48, 351–360. Pinkham, A. E., & Penn, D. L. (2006). Neurocognitive and social cognitive predictors of interpersonal skill in schizophrenia. Psychiatry Research, 30, 167–178. Salkever, D. S., Karakus, M. C., Slade, E. P., Harding, C. M., Hough, R. L., Rosenheck, R.A., et

symptoms upon interview and history in at least one of five categories: unusual thought content, suspicion/paranoia, grandiosity, perceptual anomalies, and/or disorganized communication, have revealed deficits on a variety of neuropsychological measures that are typically somewhere between healthy control performance and performance in fullblown illness. The most extensive study to date, the North American Prodrome Longitudinal Study (NAPLS), which consists of coordinated data collection at 8

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