Cocoa Design Patterns

Cocoa Design Patterns

Language: English

Pages: 456

ISBN: 0321535022

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Cocoa Design Patterns

Language: English

Pages: 456

ISBN: 0321535022

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


“Next time some kid shows up at my door asking for a code review, this is the book that I am going to throw at him.”

 

–Aaron Hillegass, founder of Big Nerd Ranch, Inc., and author of Cocoa Programming for Mac OS X

 

Unlocking the Secrets of Cocoa and Its Object-Oriented Frameworks

 

Mac and iPhone developers are often overwhelmed by the breadth and sophistication of the Cocoa frameworks. Although Cocoa is indeed huge, once you understand the object-oriented patterns it uses, you’ll find it remarkably elegant, consistent, and simple.

 

Cocoa Design Patterns begins with the mother of all patterns: the Model-View-Controller (MVC) pattern, which is central to all Mac and iPhone development. Encouraged, and in some cases enforced by Apple’s tools, it’s important to have a firm grasp of MVC right from the start.

 

The book’s midsection is a catalog of the essential design patterns you’ll encounter in Cocoa, including

  • Fundamental patterns, such as enumerators, accessors, and two-stage creation
  • Patterns that empower, such as singleton, delegates, and the responder chain
  • Patterns that hide complexity, including bundles, class clusters, proxies and forwarding, and controllers

And that’s not all of them! Cocoa Design Patterns painstakingly isolates 28 design patterns, accompanied with real-world examples and sample code you can apply to your applications today. The book wraps up with coverage of Core Data models, AppKit views, and a chapter on Bindings and Controllers.

 

Cocoa Design Patterns clearly defines the problems each pattern solves with a foundation in Objective-C and the Cocoa frameworks and can be used by any Mac or iPhone developer.

Objective-C Programmer's Reference

Perl Cookbook (2nd Edition)

Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship

C++ in a Nutshell

Intermediate Perl (2nd Edition)

Practical Maintenance Plans in SQL Server

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

encapsulate persistent data and simplifies the creation of the Model layer for many applications. NSManagedObject uses the Associative Storage pattern in Chapter 19,“Associative Storage,” to provide access to data that’s stored in memory or in files on the disk or in relational databases. NSManagedObject exists to encapsulate the underlying storage mechanism so that developers don’t need to know details about the storage. The MYEmployee class is designed in the Core Data modeling tool included in

the implementations of - (id)initImageCell:(NSImage *)anImage and -initTextCell:. #import @interface MYLabeledBarCell : NSCell { float barValue; // values in range 0.0 to 1.0 } // Overriden Designated Initializers - (id)initImageCell:(NSImage *)anImage; - (id)initTextCell:(NSString *)aString; // Overriden configuration - (BOOL)isOpaque; // Accessors - (void)setLabel:(NSString *)aLabel; - (NSString *)label; both 39 40 Chapter 3 Two-Stage Creation -

count:(NSUInteger)len { return [myCollection countByEnumeratingWithState:state objects:stackbuf count:len]; } If a custom class has an actual C array of objects already, and is immutable, the implementation is straightforward.Assume that the C array is called myCArrayOfObjects and that there is an unsigned long integer property named myObjectsCount that holds the number of objects in the C array.This yields one of the simplest implementations possible and sends everything in a single batch: -

implementation of late binding of messages than the simple –performSelector: method. NSInvocation can store messages that have nonobject return types or require complex arguments. NSInvocation stores the selector of the message to send along with the receiver of the message and all arguments. Cocoa’s Targets and Actions Pattern in Chapter 17,“Outlets,Targets, and Actions,” shows how powerful and flexible late binding with selector can be.An Action is really just a variable selector, and the

returned.The returned object has a retain count of one and must eventually be released or autoreleased.The Copying pattern is explained in Chapter 12 and the -mutableCopy method is documented in the Foundation framework and at /Developer/Documentation/Cocoa/Reference/Foundation/ObjC_classic/Protocols/ NSMutableCopying.html. NSKeyValueCoding Cocoa’s NSKeyValueCoding informal protocol is defined as part of the Foundation framework and documented at

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