Collected Works, Volume 13: Marx and Engels 1854-55

Collected Works, Volume 13: Marx and Engels 1854-55

Karl Marx, Friedrich Engels

Language: English

Pages: 831

ISBN: 2:00221795

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Collected Works, Volume 13: Marx and Engels 1854-55

Karl Marx, Friedrich Engels

Language: English

Pages: 831

ISBN: 2:00221795

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Volume info:

Volume 13 contains articles written in the period from February 13, 1854 to February 6, 1855, mostly published in the New-York Daily Tribune. The articles deal with a broad range of contemporary socio-economic and political problems, in particular with the military conflict between Russia and Turkey, which broke out in 1853 and in 1854 developed into the Crimean War, as well as with questions of the democratic and working-class movements. Considerable space in the present volume is taken up by articles on Spain, important for an understanding of the general problems of bourgeois revolutions.

MECW info:

Marx/Engels Collected Works (MECW) is the largest collection of translations into English of the works of Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels. It contains all works published by Marx and Engels in their lifetimes and numerous unpublished manuscripts and letters. The Collected Works, which was translated by Richard Dixon and others, consists of 50 volumes. It was compiled and printed between 1975 and 2005 by Progress Publishers (Moscow) in collaboration with Lawrence and Wishart (London) and International Publishers (New York).

The Collected Works contains material written by Marx between 1835 and his death in 1883, and by Engels between 1838 and his death in 1895. The early volumes include juvenilia, including correspondence between Marx and his father, Marx's poetry, and letters from Engels to his sister. Several volumes collect the pair's articles for the Neue Rheinische Zeitung.

Other volumes in the Collected Works contain well-known works of Marx and Engels, including The Communist Manifesto, The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Napoleon, and Capital, lesser-known works, and previously unpublished or untranslated manuscripts. The Collected Works includes 13 volumes of correspondence by the mature Marx and Engels, covering the period from 1844 through 1895.
Although the Collected Works is the most complete collection of the work by Marx and Engels published to date in English, it is not their complete works. A project to publish the pair's complete works in German is expected to require more than 120 volumes.

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of June, 1816, an imperial patent appeared declaring that the State would in future never again have recourse to an inconvertible paper currency; that the paper-money in circulation should be gradually withdrawn and specie be restored as the standard medium of circulation. In order to fulfill these promises, the privileged National Bank was constituted definitively, January 18th, 1818, the State having made an arrangement with the Bank by which it pledged itself to redeem the inconvertible

which it is their duty to represent to the Porte as considered probable and impending by some of the Great European Powers." (See the Blue Books on the Rights and Privileges of the Latin and Greek Churches, Vol. 1, pages 81 and 82.) Was this not "intimating" to the Sultan, on the part of England, in plain words: "that he cannot keep peace at home or preserve friendly relations with his neighbors?" The Czar had told Sir Hamilton in a very off-hand way that he would not allow England to establish

the hypocrisy and pretence of the representatives of the main political groupings, their opposition to any reforms which might affect the interests of the ruling oligarchy (for example, electoral reform), and the cumbersome and routine nature of parliamentary procedure itself. "Then why remains Parliament?" Marx asks in the article "The Treaty Between Austria and Prussia.— Parliamentary Debates of May 29", "Old Cobbett has revealed the secret. As a safety-valve for the effervescing passions of

laid before the House. The document was considered of the greatest importance, and such as might not be communicated to the other powers, notwithstanding Aberdeen's a Arif Hikmet Bey.— Ed. Telegraphic dispatch from Berlin of April 3. The Times, No. 21706, April 4, 1854.— Ed. The War Debate in Parliament 135 assurance that he had communicated the "substance" to France. T h e Czar, at all events, was not aware of such a communication having been made. The document was sanctioned and approved

February, 1853, after various comments on the exhausted state of Turkey: "'With the utmost political caducity, with a total want of ability and integrity in the men who are still its rulers, with a declining Mussulman population, and an exhausted treasury, the Porte unites as if by way of derisory contrast a dominion over some of the most fertile regions, the finest ports and the most enterprising and ingenious people of Southern Europe.... It is hard to comprehend how so great a positive evil

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