Conversations with Scorsese

Conversations with Scorsese

Language: English

Pages: 448

ISBN: 0307388794

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Conversations with Scorsese

Language: English

Pages: 448

ISBN: 0307388794

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Now in paperback, and with a new afterword: the history and process of moviemaking in general, and of Martin Scorsese's brilliant and varied films in particular, through the words and wit of the master director.

With Richard Schickel as the canny and intelligent guide, these conversations take us deep into Scorsese's life and work. He reveals which films are most autobiographical, and what he was trying to explore and accomplish in other films. He explains his personal style and describes many of the rewarding artistic and personal relationships of his career, including collaborations with Robert De Niro, Harvey Keitel, Jack Nicholson, and Leonardo DiCaprio. An invaluable illumination and appreciation of one of our most admired film directors.

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Then, when I was in Manhattan, in 1950, about eight or nine years old, I would watch Suspense Theater, or something like that, on TV and try to do my version of it in drawings. I’d paint them with watercolors. I had a whole bunch of them. Then one day my father saw me playing with them and I hid them, threw them away, as I told you before. RS: There are really none of those left? MS: No. I guess I felt ashamed of them. A year or two later, I said to myself, You know what? The hell with them,

RS: It’s grueling. MS: Absolutely grueling. But Leo’s got the youth and the energy. And the curiosity for it. Anyway, I saw the rushes of him in the screening room scene and I felt strongly that we didn’t need to include the last Las Vegas scene. I looked at the scene we had and I said, Forget it. The next day I saw him on the set. I took him to my trailer and I said, “We did the old Howard.” [Laughs.] “You have to see this stuff,” I said, “it’s beautiful—especially the blue behind his head.”

Figueroa, Gabriel Fillmore East Film Foundation, 39.1, 39.2, epi.1 films anthology, 1.1, 19.1 art direction in audience reaction to, 2.1, 2.2, 35.1 avant-garde, 5.1, 14.1 background music in, 1.1, 1.2, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 3.1, 4.1, 9.1, 19.1, 38.1, 38.2, 38.3, 38.4 biblical epic, 4.1, 18.1, 18.2, 18.3 black-and-white, 5.1, 18.1, 21.1, 27.1, 27.2, 27.3, 33.1, 33.2, 34.1, 38.1 censorship of, 1.1, 1.2, 29.1 cinematography in, 1.1, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 4.1, 7.1 classic American, 2.1, 3.1, 5.1, 7.1

them. And that conditioned his response to Public Enemy—the powerful man, full of hubris, attacked and then falling. The fallen hero. But the brutality, the toughness, of the picture was something that never left me. Maybe the humor, too. Goodfellas kind of has both—in my mind, at least. RS: Stop me if I’ve told you this, but Bill Wellman told me this story. They were all at a preview—he, Jack Warner, Darryl Zanuck, and Mike Curtiz all went together. And it was a smash. I mean, nobody had

screen with Mean Streets. Later, with Taxi Driver, we really tapped into the idea of not being one of the group, not being part of anything. I remember Bob De Niro giving a speech at the first Tribeca Film Festival a few years ago, in which at the end he said, I’ve always wanted to belong, and now I feel I do. Something like that; it’s a paraphrase, and it’s the first time I heard him actually say that. In Taxi Driver we didn’t have to say what it was about, why we were connected with it, why we

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