Defeating Depression: How to Use the People in Your Life to Open the Door to Recovery

Defeating Depression: How to Use the People in Your Life to Open the Door to Recovery

Roslyn Law

Language: English

Pages: 544

ISBN: 1849017123

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Defeating Depression: How to Use the People in Your Life to Open the Door to Recovery

Roslyn Law

Language: English

Pages: 544

ISBN: 1849017123

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


This ground-breaking new self-help book is based on Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT), a therapeutic approach being adopted by the government's nationwide Improved Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) programme, alongside Cognitive Behavioural Therapy. IPT is commonly used to treat those suffering from depression and eating disorders. IPT is now being used by IAPT therapists nationally and this book will be the first self-help book based on this approach and will be widely recommended to patients. The author, Dr Roslyn Law, is one of the UK's leading authorities on IPT.

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in the part of the story that is still to come. In Paul’s story (chapter 15), when work colleagues heard how he was made redundant they recognized the opportunity in a story of change and started to make plans for a new business together; in Jean’s story (chapter 19), her sister-in-law understood the loss she felt after her husband died and suggested ways that they could salvage some of the plans Jean thought she would have to abandon. The process outlined in this book will help you to decide

tend to prevent closeness developing. The success of a relationship can be as much about the fit between two people as about the individual contributions of each person. It is just as important to think about how you select the people to be in relationship with, and how they select you, as it is to look at what happens once you have decided to build a relationship with each other. It is quite likely that some of the difficulties you identify will overlap with the examples and themes we have

that they had been close but had hardly seen each other after they had gone to different secondary schools, and Miranda thought that this had contributed a lot to how lonely she felt at that time. She said her friend did most of the work to keep in touch, but she did generally respond when she received a message from Pamela and was pleased to hear from her. Miranda’s parents, who divorced when she was in secondary school, had both remarried. Both lived over three hours away by train and she

could do on its own. During the process of working through this book, you have often been encouraged to work with other people, whether your IPT team or your IPT therapist. Involving other people does not take away from your achievement – indeed, it shows how much more you can achieve when you combine your efforts with the support of other people. Trying to change how you felt and managed relationship problems was proving difficult to do on your own. Other people might have wanted to take away

•   repeat the verbal message, e.g. nodding when saying you agree; •   complement the verbal message, e.g. a pat on the back when saying well done; •   underline the verbal message, e.g. pounding the table when making an important point. But it can also: •   contradict the verbal message, e.g. rolling your eyes while saying you agree; •   replace the verbal message, e.g. slamming a door without saying a thing. In the last two examples the message is less clear because in the first the

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