Design and Prototyping for Drupal

Design and Prototyping for Drupal

Dani Nordin

Language: English

Pages: 168

ISBN: 1449305504

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Design and Prototyping for Drupal

Dani Nordin

Language: English

Pages: 168

ISBN: 1449305504

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Itching to build interesting projects with Drupal, but confused by the way it handles design challenges? This concise guide helps small teams and solo website designers understand how Drupal works by demonstrating the ways it outputs content. You’ll learn how to manage Drupal’s output, design around it, and then turn your design into a theme.

In the second of three volumes on Drupal design, award-winning designer Dani Nordin takes you beyond basic site planning and teaches you key strategies for working with themes, layouts, and wireframes. Discover how to use Drupal to make your vision a reality, instead of getting distracted by the system’s project and code management details.
* Learn strategies for sketching, wireframing, and designing effective layouts
* Break down a Drupal layout to understand its basic components
* Understand Drupal’s theme layer, and what to look for in a base theme
* Work with the 960 grid system to facilitate efficient wireframing and theming
* Manage Drupal markup, including the code generated by the powerful Views module
* Use LessCSS to organize CSS and help you theme your site more efficiently

Unfolded: Paper in Design, Art, Architecture and Industry

Design Thinking Research: Building Innovators (Understanding Innovation)

Exploring Materials: Creative Design for Everyday Objects

Observing the User Experience: A Practitioner's Guide to User Research (2nd Edition)

The Big Book of Lofts

Reckoning with Colin Rowe: Ten Architects Take Position

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

each. Figure 6-5. A sample grid-based layout, using a 12-column grid If I was building that out in code, it might look like this:

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new mouse; this is your new keyboard,” and tell them that they can “click” wherever they want on the paper, and then we’ll show you what happens. Dani: Are there any pitfalls to testing the prototype with users? David: One of the key things you don’t want to do is what we call a “demo,” which is more like putting it in front of someone and showing them what it does—“Isn’t my baby beautiful? Don’t you love it?” If you do that, you can’t be sure they will give you an honest answer. They’ll tell

theme maintainer) worry about updates to the theme; since your customizations will mostly involve CSS and the occasional .tpl.php file, they won’t often be completely borked by security updates. How to Choose a Base Theme Choosing a base theme is often a matter of personal preference. Drupal.org offers quite a few to choose from, and every site builder has their favorite. Whichever you choose, make sure that your base theme: Has a way of dealing with code and CSS files that makes sense

falling, and how something’s going to be implemented. The question I always ask myself is: how much of that workflow is based on the fact that I’m a team of 1–3, as opposed to being one piece of a larger team? I notice with larger teams, they do often have more clearly defined roles, so there’s not as much concern about whether you specifically can implement something, but more about whether it can be implemented by the team. Have you had experience with that? Jason: I’ve worked on teams of

Manage Display area to set up how fields are displayed in different contexts (for example, “teaser” content vs. a single page entry). This last bit about Manage Display is the one that can trip you up if you aren’t careful. Because Drupal depends on content, and the structure of that content can change during site implementation—more fields are added or removed, new categories are decided on, etc.—you may find yourself periodically going back and forth and adjusting the content types you’ve

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