Design for Outdoor Recreation

Design for Outdoor Recreation

Simon Bell

Language: English

Pages: 240

ISBN: 0415441722

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Design for Outdoor Recreation

Simon Bell

Language: English

Pages: 240

ISBN: 0415441722

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Design for Outdoor Recreation takes a detailed look at all aspects of design of facilities needed by visitors to outdoor recreation destinations. The book is a comprehensive manual for planners, designers and managers of recreation taking them through the processes of design and enabling them to find the most appropriate balance between visitor needs and the capacity of the landscape. A range of different aspects are covered including car parking, information signing, hiking, waterside activities, wildlife watching and camping.

This second edition incorporates new examples from overseas, including Australia, New Zealand, Japan and Eastern Europe as well as focusing on more current issues such as accessibility and the changing demands for recreational use.

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surfaces are expensive to lay but need little maintenance. Unsealed surfaces can be made with locally won material, which is frequently cheaper. Appearance Natural materials, especially those from the site or nearby, can reduce impact and blend into the landscape. Used for unsealed surfaces they also present a coarser texture than sealed surfaces and so tend to fit better into the wider landscape. Sealed surfaces such as bituminous macadam or asphalt are darker in colour, usually black, and very

machines. The use of entrance payment can be coupled with the management of visitor numbers. In many sites the capacity of parking, picnicking, the risk of wear and tear or of overloading toilet facilities at busy periods might suggest that the entrance should be controlled to prevent site degradation and overcrowding to the detriment of the visitors’ experience. Numbers of vehicles entering or exiting can be monitored visually or automatically and notices saying ‘Site full’ posted as required.

around which a table is constructed. Fireplaces can also be included. Where strong winds occur then some walls may be needed to keep out the rain. These can be devised so that at least one half of the shelter will be out of the wind whatever its direction. Slatted sides may prevent wind eddies back into the sheltered space. Benches can be set against the walls and a fireplace provided, with a chimney and movable sides to help it draw. In cold climates, particularly when winter sports such as

Commission and the Countryside Commission for Scotland. This has since been developed and more experience of its provision gained by providers of outdoor recreation, particularly in Britain. This play area, set out along a forest edge, looks slightly more interesting than the average urban example, but it fails to use the forest, the greatest asset available to it. Thetford Forest Park, Suffolk, England. Design for outdoor recreation 136 Many people think of play as a physical activity,

by wheelchairs or buggies, as a side grade tends to pull them constantly to one side. Construction can be by hand labour using hand-operated rollers and dumpers, or by machine such as one of the miniexcavators now available. These are ideal for path widths of between 1.2 and 1.8 m (4–6 ft). Gentle or flat terrain in wetter, less well-drained soils in wetter climates Path construction is similar to that described above except for two factors: the need for more drainage, and the problems of the

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