Design Is a Job

Design Is a Job

Mike Monteiro

Language: English

Pages: 96

ISBN: 1937557049

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Design Is a Job

Mike Monteiro

Language: English

Pages: 96

ISBN: 1937557049

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Courtesy of firestone's link/share

Co-founder of Mule Design and raconteur Mike Monteiro wants to help you do your job better. From contracts to selling design, from working with clients to working with each other, this brief book is packed with knowledge you can’t afford not to know.

Contents:

1. What Is a Designer?
2. Getting Clients
3. Choosing the Right Clients
4. Charging for Your Work
5. Working with Contracts
6. Sticking to Your Process
7. Presenting Design
8. Managing Feedback
9. Getting your Money
10. Working with Others

Xplans: Book of House Plans

Writing About Architecture: Mastering the Language of Buildings and Cities (Architecture Briefs)

The Big Book Of Font Combinations

Design for Care: Innovating Healthcare Experience

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

the shortest chapter of the book. Anything I have to tell you can be summed up thusly: charge as much as you can, deliver an honest value, and never work for free. Unfortunately, most designers feel such pangs of guilt about charging an adequate amount for their work, if anything at all, that it’s probably worth the time and effort to go a little deeper. Let’s Get Comfortable Talking About Money Before we go any further we need to get over this money thing. It has come to my attention that

you’ve clearly outlined who’s taking charge where. You may also have a project manager on your side who does the initial project recap. They should also keep track of time management and the agenda. And while everyone should have a set role, be flexible enough to let everyone play to their strengths. If your interaction designer has been championing the faceted navigation model you’re proposing, let her pitch it. Weave other people into the presentation as seamlessly as possible. Cover your

driven by different things. I can give you a baseline for how to treat a client, or a co-worker, but ultimately you’re going to have to figure out the best way to communicate with individual clients, and individual co-workers. And that takes listening, empathy, and understanding what drives people. It takes confidence, self-awareness, and discipline to have good working relationships. You need to know what you want out of those relationships, know what the other person’s concerns and anxieties

over clients at length, as well as lawyers and obviously other designers. But web design is a complex thing. Lots of moving parts. And all of those parts require a person who’s really good at that particular skill. If you’re in a small company many of these roles may be filled by the same person. If you’re in a large company, each of these roles may be further broken down into mind-numbing sub-specialties. They’re as responsible for the success of projects as you are. And as deserving of your

they tend to come in enough different shapes and sizes that some of them will not be right for you. Or you may not be right for them. For the sake of both your businesses you need to make sure you’re selecting the right clients. You have a responsibility to your potential client to make sure you’re actually the right designer for the job, and you have a responsibility to yourself to make sure the work you’re bringing in is within your capabilities. If you’re responsible for bringing in work for

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