Designing Web Navigation

Designing Web Navigation

James Kalbach

Language: English

Pages: 416

ISBN: 0596528108

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Designing Web Navigation

James Kalbach

Language: English

Pages: 416

ISBN: 0596528108

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Thoroughly rewritten for today's web environment, this bestselling book offers a fresh look at a fundamental topic of web site development: navigation design. Amid all the changes to the Web in the past decade, and all the hype about Web 2.0 and various "rich" interactive technologies, the basic problems of creating a good web navigation system remain. Designing Web Navigation demonstrates that good navigation is not about technology-it's about the ways people find information, and how you guide them.

Ideal for beginning to intermediate web designers, managers, other non-designers, and web development pros looking for another perspective, Designing Web Navigation offers basic design principles, development techniques and practical advice, with real-world examples and essential concepts seamlessly folded in. How does your web site serve your business objectives? How does it meet a user's needs? You'll learn that navigation design touches most other aspects of web site development. This book:

  • Provides the foundations of web navigation and offers a framework for navigation design
  • Paints a broad picture of web navigation and basic human information behavior
  • Demonstrates how navigation reflects brand and affects site credibility
  • Helps you understand the problem you're trying to solve before you set out to design
  • Thoroughly reviews the mechanisms and different types of navigation
  • Explores "information scent" and "information shape"
  • Explains "persuasive" architecture and other design concepts
  • Covers special contexts, such as navigation design for web applications
  • Includes an entire chapter on tagging

While Designing Web Navigation focuses on creating navigation systems for large, information-rich sites serving a business purpose, the principles and techniques in the book also apply to small sites. Well researched and cited, this book serves as an excellent reference on the topic, as well as a superb teaching guide. Each chapter ends with suggested reading and a set of questions that offer exercises for experiencing the concepts in action.

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bookmarked URL • Following a link from another site • Using a search engine  Professor Marcia Bates makes the point that information seeking can be active and passive. We come in contact with a great deal of information over our lifetimes in various ways. See Marcia Bates, “Toward an Integrated Model of Information Seeking,” The Fourth International Conference on Information Needs, Seeking and Use. (Lisbon, Portugal. September, 2002).

to access lower levels in a structure, below the main navigation pages. The term “local” implies “within a given category.” On a given page, local navigation generally shows other options at the same level of a hierarchy, as well as the options below the current page. Local navigation often works in conjunction with a global navigation system and is really an extension of the main navigation. Because local navigation varies more often than main navigation, it is often treated differently. Common

4-33 shows an example of a U.S. Supreme Court decision found on the web site for The Legal Information Institute of the Cornell Law School (www.law.cornell.edu). On this site, cases are generally given a single page. Note the size of the scrollbar in the upper right; this document is over 50 screens long, even at a fairly large browser size. For smaller resolutions it may occupy 100 screens. The nature of the content, however, calls for a single page. People doing legal research online need to

is in sync with the main navigation mechanisms. Destination Most web browsers reveal the destination of a link in the lower left of the screen when hovering over it. This provides valuable clues about the following page and may aid in navigation. URL Manipulation More advanced web users may manipulate URLs directly to navigate. Deleting directories and parameters from the end of the URL, for instance, may bring people back to the home page or a key landing page. URLs often get overlooked by site

improving the navigation based on your findings.  Instone, Keith. “Navigation Stress Test.” http://user-experience.org/uefiles/navstress. 160 E va l u at i o n Table 6-3  / Navigation stress test questions and mark-up5 Navigation question Mark up on the paper What is this page about? Draw a rectangle around the title of the page or write it on the paper yourself What site is this? Circle the site name, or write it on the paper yourself What are the major sections of this site? Label

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