Dexter and Philosophy: Mind over Spatter (Popular Culture & Philosophy)

Dexter and Philosophy: Mind over Spatter (Popular Culture & Philosophy)

Richard Greene

Language: English

Pages: 303

ISBN: 0812697170

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Dexter and Philosophy: Mind over Spatter (Popular Culture & Philosophy)

Richard Greene

Language: English

Pages: 303

ISBN: 0812697170

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


What explains the huge popular following for Dexter, currently the most-watched show on cable, which sympathetically depicts a serial killer driven by a cruel compulsion to brutally slay one victim after another?
Although Dexter Morgan kills only killers, he is not a vigilante animated by a sense of justice but a charming psychopath animated by a lust to kill, ritualistically and bloodily. However his gory appetite is controlled by “Harry’s Code,” which limits his victims to those who have gotten away with murder, and his job as a blood spatter expert for the Miami police department gives him the inside track on just who those legitimate targets may be.
In Dexter and Philosophy, an elite team of philosophers don their rubber gloves and put Dexter’s deeds under the microscope. Since Dexter is driven to ritual murder by his “Dark Passenger,” can he be blamed for killing, especially as he only murders other murderers? Does Dexter fit the profile of the familiar fictional type of the superhero? What part does luck play in making Dexter who he is? How and why are horror and disgust turned into aesthetic pleasure for the TV viewer? How essential is Dexter’s emotional coldness to his lust for slicing people up? Are Dexter’s lies and deceptions any worse than the lies and deceptions of the non-criminals around him? Why does Dexter long to be a normal human being and why can’t he accomplish this apparently simple goal?

American Pop: Popular Culture Decade by Decade, Volumes 1-4

Why We Love Sociopaths: A Guide To Late Capitalist Television

In a Lonely Street: Film Noir, Genre, Masculinity

The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo and Philosophy: Everything Is Fire (The Blackwell Philosophy and Pop Culture Series)

Bitch, Issue 55: Elemental (Fall 2012)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

booze, paternal fidelity, sex, smoking and, of course, swearing. In this, she is a foil for Dexter’s lack of emotion. The Self-Indulgent Person Fourth, Aristotle discusses a more extreme form of moral weakness we might call self-indulgence. A morally weak person rationally chooses what is virtuous or excellent, but habitually succumbs to excessive desire. But self-indulgent persons don’t know what is virtuous, or at least don’t care. They openly choose excess. A man is self-indulgent

that they are incapable of being motivated for moral reasons. One reason for thinking that the average psychopath lacks the ability to be motivated by moral concerns is that psychopaths can’t feel empathy. They can understand that people guide their behavior by moral demands and that moral norms give reasons for why it is wrong to hurt people, but they do not feel any of the emotions that tend to motivate other people to act on moral norms. For example, they lack the ability to feel compassion

transparent glass. The ritual recreates and avenges death, masters it, and punishes the doppelgangers symbolizing the murderer who ravaged him. Each slaughter ritualizes the transformation from wretched helplessness to utter control over blood and death. Here we enter into the psychology of ritualized and compulsive behaviors, where the compulsion to repeat, master, avenge, and transmogrify trauma can be seen in rituals as ordinary as obsessive compulsive tendencies, in violence, even in sexual

Miguel demonstrate that. Dexter’s interactions with the Skinner at the end of season three are also evidence that Dexter’s deontology has an emotional foundation. He demonstrates throughout the course of the show that he has a better understanding of people that are similar to himself. He does not understand Masuka’s sexual dispositions, nor does he understand Rita’s desires in the family. This is largely because, as he admits himself, he does not share any similar emotions, and he hasn’t

normality is simply a facade, constructed in an attempt to fit in with everyday society. Dexter has carefully designed and adopted the mask of normalcy to fool others, including the authorities and those closest to him, Deb and Rita. Following the revelation in Season 1 that Brian Moser/Rudy Cooper is his brother and Dexter’s subsequent killing of Brian in compliance with Harry’s Code, Dexter says: I drove away a brother who accepts me, sees me, for an adopted sister who’d reject me if she knew.

Download sample

Download