Docker: Up & Running

Docker: Up & Running

Karl Matthias, Sean P. Kane

Language: English

Pages: 232

ISBN: 1491917571

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Docker: Up & Running

Karl Matthias, Sean P. Kane

Language: English

Pages: 232

ISBN: 1491917571

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Updated to cover Docker version 1.10

Docker is quickly changing the way that organizations are deploying software at scale. But understanding how Linux containers fit into your workflow—and getting the integration details right—are not trivial tasks. With this practical guide, you’ll learn how to use Docker to package your applications with all of their dependencies, and then test, ship, scale, and support your containers in production.

Two Lead Site Reliability Engineers at New Relic share much of what they have learned from using Docker in production since shortly after its initial release. Their goal is to help you reap the benefits of this technology while avoiding the many setbacks they experienced.

  • Learn how Docker simplifies dependency management and deployment workflow for your applications
  • Start working with Docker images, containers, and command line tools
  • Use practical techniques to deploy and test Docker-based Linux containers in production
  • Debug containers by understanding their composition and internal processes
  • Deploy production containers at scale inside your data center or cloud environment
  • Explore advanced Docker topics, including deployment tools, networking, orchestration, security, and configuration

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summary of what you have and how it should help you improve the way you deliver and scale software services. We realize that many people don’t read technical books front to back and that something like the preface is incredibly easy to skip, but if you’re still with us, here is a quick guide to some different approaches to reading this book: If you are new to Linux containers, start at the beginning. The first two chapters are intended to get your head around the basics of Docker and Linux

lp:x:7:7:lp:/var/spool/lpd:/usr/sbin/nologin root@f86f8e528b92:/# id lp uid=7(lp) gid=7(lp) groups=7(lp) root@409c2a8216b1:/# exit If we then run ps au on the Docker host while that container is running as UID 7 (-u 7), we would see that the Docker host would show the container process as being run by halt instead of lp: $ docker run -d -u 7 ubuntu:latest sleep 1000 5525...06c6 $ ps ua | grep sleep 1185 halt sleep 1000 1192 root grep sleep This could be particulary confusing if a well-known

describe-container-instances --cluster testing \ --container-instances zse12345-12b3-45gf-6789-12ab34cd56ef78 { "failures": [], "containerInstances": [ { "status": "ACTIVE", "registeredResources": [ { "integerValue": 1024, "longValue": 0, "type": "INTEGER", "name": "CPU", "doubleValue": 0.0 }, { "integerValue": 3768, "longValue": 0, "type": "INTEGER", "name": "MEMORY", "doubleValue": 0.0 }, { "name": "PORTS", "longValue": 0, "doubleValue": 0.0, "stringSetValue": [ "2376", "22", "51678", "2375" ],

helloworld proc/ sys/ /mnt/sda1/var/lib/docker/aufs/mnt/36...a3/dev: console pts/ shm/ /mnt/sda1/var/lib/docker/aufs/mnt/36...a3/dev/pts: /mnt/sda1/var/lib/docker/aufs/mnt/36...a3/dev/shm: /mnt/sda1/var/lib/docker/aufs/mnt/36...a3/etc: hostname hosts mtab resolv.conf /mnt/sda1/var/lib/docker/aufs/mnt/36...a3/proc: /mnt/sda1/var/lib/docker/aufs/mnt/36...a3/sys: You can see that in addition to console device and basic /etc files, the only other file is the helloworld binary, which contains

step in the deployment process is clearly separated. It is perfectly fine to have a single button, that builds a container, tests it, and then deploys it, assuming that you trust your testing processes — but you don’t want to be forced to rebuild a container simply in order to deploy it to another environment. Docker supports the twelve-factor ideal well in this area because there is a clean hand-off point between building an image and shipping it to production: the registry. If your build

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