Don DeLillo: Mao II, Underworld, Falling Man

Don DeLillo: Mao II, Underworld, Falling Man

Language: English

Pages: 207

ISBN: B00MAD6SY2

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Don DeLillo: Mao II, Underworld, Falling Man

Language: English

Pages: 207

ISBN: B00MAD6SY2

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Introduction: Don DeLillo and the Dream Release-Stacey Olster

PART I: Mao II (1991)
Delphic DeLillo: Mao II and Millennial Dread-David Cowart
Mao II and the New World Order-Peter Knight
Mao II and Mixed Media-Laura Barrett

PART II Underworld (1997)
Underworld, Memory, and the Recycling of Cold War Narrative-Thomas Hill Schaub
Underworld and the Architecture of Urban Space-David L. Pike
Underworld, Ethnicity, and Found Object Art: Reason and Revelation-Josephine Gattuso Hendin

PART III Falling Man (2007)
Global Horizons in Falling Man-John Carlos Rowe
Bodies in Rest and Motion in Falling Man-Linda S. Kauffman
Witnessing Trauma: Falling Man and Performance Art-John N. Duvall

A Horse Named Sorrow

Unravel: A Novel

Safe Haven

Die Verletzung

Carrie

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jesuits of Fordham” (“DeLillo’s Apocalyptic” 53), but much the same can be said of Joyce—whose non serviam still echoes (indeed, DeLillo has invoked the Irish master’s “[s]ilence, exile, cunning” credo [LeClair, “Interview” 20]). Like so many in the modern and contemporary era, DeLillo articulates a modicum of nostalgia for the certainties enjoyed by so many for so long, but nowhere in his work does he really gainsay the “rockbound doubt” expressed by James Axton in The Names (92). (McClure notes

as “[v]olition at its lowest ebb” (539). Yet he sees Nick as capable of intensity: “Aquinas said only intense actions will strengthen a habit. Not mere repetition. Intensity makes for moral accomplishment. An intense and persevering will. This is an element of seriousness. Constancy. This is an element. A sense of purpose. A selfchosen goal” (539). This kind of will is generally defined as velleitas ratio, a reasoned purpose that carries with it a mandate to action. It is intention implemented in

ruins in an area called “the Wall, partly for the graffiti facade and partly the general sense of exclusion—it was a tuck of land adrift from the social order” (239). On a Wall that still stands amid the rubble, Ismael’s graffiti art memorializes the dead in pink and blue angels, giving their names and causes of death: “TB, AIDS, beatings, drive-by shootings, measles, asthma, abandonment at birth—left in a dumpster, forgot in a car, left in Glad Bag stormy night” (239). The dying memorialize the

psychotic folly, [. . .] a séance in hell” (216). Notably, Keith does not deny this. In fact, the gamblers joke about being like vampires returning to their coffins before dawn. But the joking disguises a deeper truth, which is that Keith has chosen an artificial environment that is anonymous, hermetically sealed, ruled by a strict code. It is a denatured world outside of time (no clocks in casinos). For Keith, that’s its appeal. But Lianne frames her objections quite specifically in terms of

Rhetoric of Seeing 9/11.” PMLA 118 (2003): 1236–50. Conte, Joseph M. “Writing amid the Ruins: 9/11 and Cosmopolis.” The Cambridge Companion to Don DeLillo. Ed. John N. Duvall. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2008. 179–92. Kauffman, Linda S. “The Wake of Terror: Don DeLillo’s ‘In the Ruins of the Future,’ ‘Baader-Meinhof,’ and Falling Man.” Modern Fiction Studies 54 (2008): 353–77. —. “World Trauma Center.” American Literary History 21 (2009): 647–59. Thurschwell, Adam. “Writing and Terror: Don DeLillo on

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