Drink the Harvest: Making and Preserving Juices, Wines, Meads, Teas, and Ciders

Drink the Harvest: Making and Preserving Juices, Wines, Meads, Teas, and Ciders

Nan K. Chase, DeNeice C. Guest

Language: English

Pages: 232

ISBN: 1612121594

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Drink the Harvest: Making and Preserving Juices, Wines, Meads, Teas, and Ciders

Nan K. Chase, DeNeice C. Guest

Language: English

Pages: 232

ISBN: 1612121594

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Preserving the harvest doesn’t have to stop with jam and pickles. Many fruits, vegetables, and herbs can be made into delicious beverages to enjoy fresh or preserve for later. Drink the Harvest presents simple recipes accompanied by mouthwatering photographs for a variety of teas, syrups, ciders, wines, and kombuchas. DeNeice C. Guest and Nan K. Chase also provide advice for harvesting ingredients for maximum flavor and even creating your own backyard beverage garden. Pour a refreshing glass of Passionflower-Lemon Balm Wine and drink in the possibilities. 

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If your garden produces tons and tons of tomatoes, here is one way to use them. Ingredients 20 pounds tomatoes (about 35 medium sized), quartered Filtered water, enough to cover tomatoes Lemon juice, 2 tablespoons per quart of tomato juice (for canning) Salt, 1⁄4 teaspoon per quart of tomato juice (for canning) Instructions 1. Put the tomatoes into a large nonreactive stockpot, and then add filtered water to cover the fruit by about 1⁄2 inch. Bring the contents to a boil. 2.

holiday punch: it blends well with all sorts of other flavors. In addition, as a mixer for cocktails it’s hard to beat. Ingredients 1 gallon filtered water 1 quart honey by volume (about 3 pounds) 1 cup any fruit juice or 1–2 tablespoons any jelly dissolved in 1 cup filtered water 2 teaspoons (1 packet) of Pasteur Champagne yeast or yeast for white wine 11⁄4 pounds fresh or frozen mixed berries (blueberries, raspberries, strawberries, blackberries, or other berries) 1⁄2 cup raisins

weather conditions. If you buy locally grown plant starts, you are more likely to have success in severe conditions in your area. The locally grown plants will already be acclimated and can put on more robust growth in a hurry. Peaches. Finicky about growing conditions, peach trees require confident major pruning every year and don’t live long, commonly just 15 or 20 years. They often need lots of spraying to contain diseases, which can run rampant over tree and fruit. But go ahead and try

beverages: juice mixes, wine, mead, syrups, and leaf teas. They can start bearing in just a few years but will always require pruning and thinning, and sometimes need support structures to help maximize yield. Berries can thrive on thin rocky soil that’s generally dry, but they need extra water to help set fruit; in cold climates they should be mulched with straw in winter. raspberry Blueberries. If you can grow blue- berries, plant as many bushes as possible. Their nutritional value tops

store-bought organic fruit with no color added to the peels is all right. 2. Rinse the citrus gently to remove dust. Use a sharp knife or peeling tool to remove the colored outer layer of the peel, being careful not to include any of the white pith underneath it. The peel may be in long strips or shorter pieces. 3. Spread the peels on the trays of a dehydrator. Follow manufacturer’s instructions for temperature and time to process, generally about 135°F for 1–2 hours, until they are dry enough

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