Elephants on Acid: And Other Bizarre Experiments (Harvest Original)

Elephants on Acid: And Other Bizarre Experiments (Harvest Original)

Alex Boese

Language: English

Pages: 304

ISBN: 0156031353

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Elephants on Acid: And Other Bizarre Experiments (Harvest Original)

Alex Boese

Language: English

Pages: 304

ISBN: 0156031353

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


When Tusko the Elephant woke in his pen at the Lincoln Park Zoo on the morning of August 3, 1962, little did he know that he was about to become the test subject in an experiment to determine what happens to an elephant given a massive dose of LSD. In Elephants on Acid, Alex Boese reveals to readers the results of not only this scientific trial but of scores of other outrageous, amusing, and provocative experiments found in the files of modern science.

Why can’t people tickle themselves? Would the average dog summon help in an emergency? Will babies instinctually pick a well-balanced diet? Is it possible to restore life to the dead? Read Elephants on Acid and find out!

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some effect. Nevertheless, the gaming industry and retailers throughout the country immediately took notice. Easy money, they thought, never smelled so good. Pump in a few good scents and wait for the cash to roll in. Rival researchers, however, criticized Hirsch’s work, complaining that he never identified the jackpot scent, making it impossible for them to evaluate his results. Consumer groups, on the other hand, decried the dawning of an era of manipulative smell technology. Since the early

“gorillas in our midst,” as Simons and Chabris put it, are simply hard to see. Incidentally, people who were asked to focus on the black-clothed team saw the gorilla far more often—83 percent of the time. Presumably this is because subjects who were visually tracking white-clothed players tuned out anything black, including black gorillas. If, instead, Ricardo Montalban had wandered by in a white suit, those who followed the black team probably would have missed him. Perhaps the optical

twenty young boys were sleeping at an Upstate New York summer camp. He played it in the middle of the night, after he felt sure none of them were awake. Competing with the chirping of crickets, the phrase repeated in the darkness 300 times a night, fifty-four nights in a row. The boys heard it in their sleep 16,200 times before the summer was over. LeShan wanted to find out whether verbal suggestions given during sleep could influence waking behavior. All the boys bit their nails. So would

cardiotachometer was actually quite intrusive. Two rubber straps held copper electrodes to the chest, and these electrodes, in turn, were attached to a one-hundred-foot wire that led to a room full of recording equipment. Being attached to the cardiotachometer was like being on a long leash. But as long as people ignored the cord, they could do everything just as they normally would. So, like kids with a new toy, Boas and Goldschmidt set out to measure the heart rate during every activity

untickleable child. Did the children suffer any psychological damage as a result of the experiment? Did they develop a profound fear of masked men, a fear they could never quite understand? We don’t know. A follow-up study was not conducted. Leuba’s study received scant attention from the scientific community, although fifty-eight years later Dr. Harris did cite it in her mock-tickle-machine study (see chapter two). However, a faint echo of Leuba’s experiment can be found in American popular

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