Eminent Chinese of the Ch'ing Period 1644-1912, Volume 1

Eminent Chinese of the Ch'ing Period 1644-1912, Volume 1

Arthur W. Hummel

Language: English

Pages: 621

ISBN: 2:00250820

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Eminent Chinese of the Ch'ing Period 1644-1912, Volume 1

Arthur W. Hummel

Language: English

Pages: 621

ISBN: 2:00250820

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


TOCed
Contributors include: K. Biggerstaff, H. Dubs, J.K. Fairbank, Fang Chao-ying, L.C.Goodrich, Hu Shih, T.Numata, E. Swisher, Teng Ssu-yu, C.M. Wilbur, H. Wilhelm. Hummel’s biographical dictionary remains the single indispensable reference tool for Chinese history since 1644. It was first published in 1943–44. ‘The best history of China of the last 300 years’ – Hu Shih.

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Kiukiang. Abashed at his failure, he asked the Celestial King Hung Hsiu-ch'i.ian [q. v.] to punish him. However, instead of being punished, he was rewarded (1855) for his enterprise with a higher title. For the purpose of drawing the government forces away from Kiukiang Ch'en Yi.i-ch'eng and Shih Ta-k'ai [q. v.] went back to Hupeh, retaking Wuchang on April 3, 1855. Ch'en Yi.i-ch'eng and other generals defeated the imperialists near Nanking and thereupon Ch'en was made a marquis. Though the

Chinese government. On August 20 the emperor instructed Ch'i-shan to negotiate with a view to getting the British back to Canton for the settlement of these matters. Ch'i-shan's entertainment of the British emissaries in specially prepared tents set up at Taku, and his tact and consideration in the negotiations held there on the 30th and 31st, were so successful that on September 17 they promised to leave for Canton. For this diplomatic success Ch'i-shan was sent to Canton to take the place of

hsii kao, 10 chilan, being printed in 1854. His youngest son, Ch'ien I-fu -~m, reprinted these in 1880-81, adding two collections of his father's poems: ltiJm~ K'o-ch'u chi, (4 chuan); and ~~/~m Lil-i hsiao-kao, (2 chilan). Ch'ien I-chi had four sons, of whom the eldest, Ch'ien Pao-hui ~1(;!: (T . .::f~), and the third, Ch'ien Ch'ang-ch'un tl~ i!J (T . .:f1H) both obtained the chu-jen degree in the year 1840. 151 *t!i <*.f) Ch'ien Ch'ien [l/491/6a; 2/73/13b; 6/10/4a; Chia-hsing hsien chih

returned to his native pla~e where he died soon after. Ch'iu Feng-chia produced many poems of a patriotic nature, but those of his early years were lost in the wars of Formosa. His later poems were collected in 12 chUan under the title, {ilfif 8 ;fl~® Ling-hai jih-lou shih-ch'ao. But Ch'iu's principal activity was the superintending of flood control in eastern Honan, western Shantung, and northern Anhwei (175758). Upon returning eight years later (1766) to examine conservancy work in the same

fell to the rebel leader, Li Tzu-ch'eng [q. v.]. Chou escaped to Nanking but did not serve in the Court of Chu Yu-sung [q. v.]. In 1645, when the Manchu army under Dodo [q. v.] conquered Nanking, Chou joined the new regime, serving in northern Kiangsu, first as salt controller of the Huai River region (1645) and then as intendant of the Huai-Yang Circuit (1646). In 1647 he was sent to Fukien where he served as provincial judge (1647-49), as junior financial commissioner (1649-53), and as senior

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