Encyclopedia of Ancient Asian Civilizations (Facts on File Library of World History)

Encyclopedia of Ancient Asian Civilizations (Facts on File Library of World History)

C. F. W. Higham

Language: English

Pages: 465

ISBN: 2:00008628

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Encyclopedia of Ancient Asian Civilizations (Facts on File Library of World History)

C. F. W. Higham

Language: English

Pages: 465

ISBN: 2:00008628

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Encyclopedia of Ancient Asian Civilization is a new and exciting addition to Facts On File's series of encyclopedias of ancient history. It covers ancient Asia from the Jomon culture in Japan in approximately 11,000 BCE through the Cambodian empires of Funan, Chenla, and Angkor that lasted until the 15th century. In many cases - for example the states of Champa in present-day Vietnam which are only described in French and Vietnamese texts and the Dvaravati state of central. Thailand which is best covered in the Thai language - the civilizations covered have thus far been treated only marginally in English literature. Written by one of the preeminent experts in the field, this encyclopedia is the ideal resource for high school and college students researching the subject as well as a useful scholarly reference. Each of the 11, area-specific sections begins with an outline of the region's ancient history, followed by A-to-Z entries that cover archaeological sites; agricultural and economic development; personalities and political institutions; as well as articles on religion, trade, warfare, and other important topics. The eleven sections are: 1. The Civilization of China; 2. The Indus Civilization; 3. The Civilizations of India; 4. The Civilizations of Sri Lanka; 5. The Civilizations of Burma; 6. Thailand: the Civilization of Dvaravati; 7. Cambodia: Funan, Chenla, and Angkor; 8. Champa, Vietnam; 9. The Maritime states of island Southeast Asia; 10. The Civilization of Korea; 11. The Civilization of Japan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

the end of the eighth century. Two reused inscriptions from the central tower date to 704 and 717, respectively. The latter records a foundation by the mratan (official) Kirtigana to the god Gamhiresvara and notes donations to the temple, which include rice, draft cattle, cloth, and workers. There can be no doubt that this area, so close to the future center of Angkor, was occupied and farmed by the early eighth century. The central sanctuary yielded six bronze statues, two of a Hindu deity and

invade China. As early as 178 B.C.E. the Han adviser Zhao Zuo identified a way of solving two problems by urging the settlement of farmers from the overpopulated center on the northern border regions as a bulwark against incursions. There were incentives for people to move. Land was provided, housing was constructed, and there were tax remissions and medical facilities. In 119 B.C.E. this policy was intensified after a serious flooding of the Huang River, when more than 129 700,000 people were

27 hectares (67.5 acres). BUDDHISM played a central role in the city. There was a department for copying sacred texts in the palace, and numerous Buddhist monks lived in the city. Their services were called on when, in 735, Japan was hit by a smallpox epidemic that is said to have killed a third of the population. The most important of all the temples was undoubtedly the TODAIJI, located due east of the royal palace on the edge of the city. It housed a massive gilt bronze casting of the Buddha

state. The archaeological record of Champa, from which most new information will come, has barely been tapped. The principal centers concentrate in riverine plains; MY SON, TRA KIEU, DONG DUONG, and Po Nagar are the best known. Further reading: Guillon, E. Cham Art. London: Thames and Hudson, 2001; Higham, C. F. W. Early Cultures of Mainland Southeast Asia. Bangkok: River Books, 2002. Champanagar Champanagar is a city site located in southern Bihar province, India, commanding traffic on the

chariot burials at Anyang was but a prelude to the recovery of further examples. Fragments of a chariot were found in the entrance ramp to the massive royal grave numbered M1001. Three pits were examined in 1987 at Guojiazhuang, Anyang, and one contained the remains of a chariot associated with two horses and two men. This was a particularly wellpreserved tomb, providing insight into the stages in the mortuary ritual of what must have been part of a sacrificial offering during the interment of a

Download sample

Download