Ender's Game and Philosophy: Genocide Is Child's Play (Popular Culture and Philosophy)

Ender's Game and Philosophy: Genocide Is Child's Play (Popular Culture and Philosophy)

D. E. Wittkower, Lucinda Rush

Language: English

Pages: 263

ISBN: 0812698347

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Ender's Game and Philosophy: Genocide Is Child's Play (Popular Culture and Philosophy)

D. E. Wittkower, Lucinda Rush

Language: English

Pages: 263

ISBN: 0812698347

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Ender’s Game, Orson Scott Card’s award-winning 1985 novel, has been discovered and rediscovered by generations of science fiction fans, even being adopted as reading by the U.S. Marine Corps. Ender's Game and its sequels explore rich themes — the violence and cruelty of children, the role of empathy in war, and the balance of individual dignity and the social good — with compelling elements of a coming-of-age story.

Ender’s Game and Philosophy brings together over 30 philosophers to engage in wide-ranging discussion on issues such as: the justifiability of pre-emptive strikes; how Ender’s disconnected and dispassionate violence is mirrored in today’s drone warfare; whether the end of saving the species can justify the most brutal means; the justifiability of lies and deception in wartime, and how military schools produce training in virtue.

The authors of Ender’s Game and Philosophy challenge readers to confront the challenges that Ender’s Game presents, bringing new insights to the idea of a just war, the virtues of the soldier, the nature of childhood, and the serious work of playing games.(less)

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However, this claim to unfairness is often countered by the fact that cheating acts are rampant in sport. Is it still cheating if everyone cheats? Because cheating acts are rampant, condemnation of acts of normative cheating is difficult. Claims that actions are wrong because they break the rules ring hollow when declared in a culture where such acts have been normalized and are expected. For example, the use of prohibited substances or methods in sport, or doping, is an example of normative

editor of compilation. PS3553.A655E53 2013 813'.54—dc23 2013023124 Transmissions from the Ansible Rules of Engagement 01. Push 1 for Remote War TIM BLACKMORE 02. What Would Saint Thomas Aquinas Do? JENNIFER SWANSON 03. Winning Without Honor SHAWN MCKINNEY 04. Is Ender Wiggin a Cheater Cheater Bugger Eater? JOAN GRASSBAUGH FORRY Minds and Bodies 05. Where Does Ender’s Consciousness End? YOCHAI ATARIA 06. Hive-Queens and Harms PAUL NEIMAN AND DANIEL DRUVENGA 07. Humanity beyond

connection with their former controller, the Buggers become incapable of responding to any stimuli, even to save their own lives. What this shows us is that the Buggers have no mind of their own. They’re only the telepathically-controlled robot arms of the hive-queen. For a queen, losing a few Buggers is like you clipping your fingernails. Nothing of value has been lost, and you can always grow new ones. Killing a hive-queen, on the other hand, is something quite different. As Mazer points out,

the way that the I.F. is worried that certain information might ruin Ender and render him unfit to command the fleet. Just as Graff and his superiors worry that Ender will turn out to be too much like Peter or too much like Valentine, the founders of this ideal city must make sure the guardians become neither too savage and harsh nor too gentle and soft (lines 410c–412a). The solution in both cases is for the perfect commander to be at once both hard and soft, to be courageous and decisive and

of Double Effect that requires discriminating between military and civilian targets in war. Weapons of Mass Destruction violate the discrimination requirement because they unavoidably and indiscriminately kill civilians in large numbers. Dr. Device is a perfect example of the indiscriminate nature of Weapons of Mass Destruction. What happens when self-defense is only possible through indiscriminate violence? If the fight is with an overwhelmingly powerful opponent, then extreme measures have to

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