Environmental Law in China: Mitigating Risk and Ensuring Compliance

Environmental Law in China: Mitigating Risk and Ensuring Compliance

Charles McElwee

Language: English

Pages: 348

ISBN: 0195390016

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Environmental Law in China: Mitigating Risk and Ensuring Compliance

Charles McElwee

Language: English

Pages: 348

ISBN: 0195390016

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


In recent years, China's leaders have started to confront the environmental, economic, and social costs of unchecked development. China's increasing reliance on foreign oil has engendered national security fears and launched a drive for more efficient transportation systems and domestic renewable energy projects. Meanwhile, pressure from a rising middle class and the international community has focused leadership attention on ways to make China's economic engine run more efficiently and with less impact upon the domestic and global environment. This profound shift in priorities has elevated environmental sustainability to the top of the national agenda. To advance this new agenda, the environmental laws that China has enacted over the past thirty years are being strengthened, and new environmental regulations and standards are being issued everyday. Entities operating in China are faced with the need to understand the impact of China's environmental law requirements upon their businesses, and to take actions to ensure that they are in compliance with those requirements.

In Environmental Law in China: Managing Risk and Ensuring Compliance, Charles McElwee addresses how China's environmental regulatory and legal frameworks are structured, how to maintain operational compliance with the environmental laws and regulations, how to ensure products sold in China comply with environmental regulations, and the potential risks and liabilities that attend non-compliance. McElwee offers unique insight into how environmental law is in fact applied, setting forth a realistic account of the way companies encounter Chinese environmental regulations at both the local and national levels.

Dangerous Strait: The U.S.-Taiwan-China Crisis

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

and rain Till a smooth lake rises in the narrow gorges. The mountain goddess if she is still there Will marvel at a world so changed. While the legacy of such a systematic assault upon nature is painfully obvious today, at the time the efforts to tame nature were relatively good intentioned. Mao sought to harness nature to lessen its threats and benefit material progress; he did not actively promote industrial pollution. There were posters that encouraged children to shoot sparrows (one of the

grassland, unreclaimed land, beaches, and other natural resources are owned by the state, that is, by the National Government 33 Article 22: The state is required to protect “places of scenic and historical interest, valuable cultural monuments, and treasures and other important items of China’s historical and cultural heritage”; and most significantly, Article 26: The “state protects and improves the living environment and the ecological environment, and prevents and remedies pollution and

Commission, outrank ministries and set policies for and coordinate the related activities of different administrative organs. The State Council also directly administers a number of administrative and professional entities that are not commissions or ministries. In some cases, these entities have been granted “ministry-level status,” such as the former State Environmental Protection Administration (SEPA) (the predecessor to the Ministry of Environmental Protection), but generally they rank below

Levy Standard III, (I) and (II). 214. If the noise discharged from multiple sites at the boundary of a certain entity exceeds the standard, the fees shall be calculated according to the highest noise level. If the noise is discharged from two or more sites along a 100 meter or longer boundary, the fees shall be charged at a doubled rate. Levy Standard IV, Note: 1. 215. Levy Standard IV, Note 6. 216. This requirement accords with the Noise Pollution Law (Article 16) that only requires the payment

rules, the provinces are permitted to phase them in over three years, depending upon their environmental quality, and social, economic, and technical conditions (Article 52). The draft requires “key” pollution sources, such as centralized domestic and industrial wastewater treatment facilities and entities in the thermal power, petrochemical, iron and steel, nonferrous metals, cement, paper, chemicals, printing, and dyeing industries to apply for permits within one year. There is no clear

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