Ferment Your Vegetables: A Fun and Flavorful Guide to Making Your Own Pickles, Kimchi, Kraut, and More

Ferment Your Vegetables: A Fun and Flavorful Guide to Making Your Own Pickles, Kimchi, Kraut, and More

Amanda Feifer

Language: English

Pages: 208

ISBN: 1592336825

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Ferment Your Vegetables: A Fun and Flavorful Guide to Making Your Own Pickles, Kimchi, Kraut, and More

Amanda Feifer

Language: English

Pages: 208

ISBN: 1592336825

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Ferment Your Vegetables for Flavor, Health, and Fun!

Fermented vegetables are a great, healthy addition to anyone's diet. Abundant in probiotics, enzymes, vitamins, minerals, and more, research continues to reveal the many ways that these foods positively contribute to our well-being. From kimchi and sauerkraut to pickles and kvass, fermented foods have been part of the human diet for millennia--and are rightfully reclaiming their place at our daily table.

The idea of fermenting vegetables at home can be intimidating for those who have never tried it before. The truth is, it's quite easy once you learn just a few basic concepts. In Ferment Your Vegetables, author Amanda Feifer, fermentation expert and founder of phickle.com, serves as your guide, showing you, step by step, how you can create traditional, delicious fermented food at home, using only simple ingredients and a little time. No fancy starters or elaborate equipment required.

Using only veggies, a few spices, and a glass jar, here's just a small sampling of recipes you could start making today:

Zucchini Bread Pickles

Curried Cauliflower Pickles

Pint of Pickled Peppers

Simplest Sauerkraut

Ginger Beet Kraut

Green Bean Kimchi

Wild Fermented Tomato Sauce

Bullseye Beet Kvass

Ferment Your Vegetables will make beginners wonder why they didn't start sooner, and give veteran fermenters loads of new ideas and techniques to try at home. All aboard the probiotic train!

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comes from using a variety of spicier radishes too. Feel free to go either route, depending on what you have access to and your preference for milder or zingier ’chi. Ingredients 1 daikon or 1 pound (450 g) mixed radishes 2 tablespoons (38 g) kosher salt 1/2 cup (120 ml) filtered water 1 tablespoon (10 g) rice flour 4 cloves of garlic 2 inches (5 cm) of ginger 1 small onion, coarsely chopped 1/2 teaspoon fish sauce 1/4 cup (30 g) gochugaru 1/2 bunch of Korean chives, trimmed Cut the

long, 1 1/2 inch (4 cm) wide strips of napa cabbage. Cut horizontally across each strip to create roughly 1 1/2-inch (4 cm) squares. Place the cabbage pieces into a large bowl. Slice the daikon into 1/4- to 1/2-inch (5 mm to 1.5 cm) wide strips and cut them down to 2 to 3 inches (5 to 7.5 cm) in length, if necessary. Add to the bowl with the cabbage. Add the salt to the water and stir to dissolve. Pour the brine into the bowl. Use a plate or another food-safe, nonmetallic item to keep the

really makes this pickled sip a success. 1 head of iceberg lettuce, quartered 1 shallot (15 g), peeled and sliced in half 1 large bunch of dill, stems trimmed 4 juniper berries 1 teaspoon (4 g) mustard seed 1 teaspoon (2 g) peppercorns 1/2 bunch (15 g) of mint 2 quarts (2 L) filtered water 1 to 2 teaspoons (6 to 12 g) salt (optional) Make sure that the lettuce is fresh and that any soft, brown, or orangish pieces have been removed. Place all the seasonings into a 1-gallon (4 L) jar and

kimchi with clean hands and utensils. Yield: 6 to 8 heads of kimchi The amount of brine needed will vary based on the size of the cabbages and the size of the vessel you choose for brining. Use a concentration of 2 teaspoons (14 g) kosher salt per 1 cup (235 ml) filtered water for a 6% brine. ⊲ CORN ON THE COB Some call these sweet and sour corncobs because some of the corn sweetness remains after fermentation, but the distinctive sour flavors of fermentation are also prominent. The best

night when you bring it in. The night of the third day, add the lemon juice. Stir or shake very well. Put it back outside for 2 more days, bring it in, and shake/stir well each night. At the end of the last night, bring your sun pickle inside for good. Heat the mustard oil in a saucepan over high heat for 5 minutes, until smoking. Remove from the heat, let it cool to room temperature, and then pour over your veggie/spice mix. Stir well. Use a spatula or spoon to scrape excess spice mixture

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