Florence Lin's Complete Book of Chinese Noodles, Dumplings and Breads

Florence Lin's Complete Book of Chinese Noodles, Dumplings and Breads

Florence Lin

Language: English

Pages: 345

ISBN: 0688037968

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Florence Lin's Complete Book of Chinese Noodles, Dumplings and Breads

Florence Lin

Language: English

Pages: 345

ISBN: 0688037968

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


An experienced teacher of Chinese cooking and a well-established author in the field (Chinese Regional Cookbook, etc.), Lin contrives here a novel departure from conventionally organized cookbooks. She divides the contents into three kinds of doughs: wheat-flour, rice-flour and those made from beans and other starches, and provides numerous recipes for noodles, dumplings and breads in each category. Much of the volume, however, is given over to fillings and accompanying dishessoups, salads, sauces and a wide variety of casserole combinations. This excellent guide is a large, generously packed volume, less specialized than the title implies and full of cook-ahead and other time-saving hints.

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re"l)lution in the economy. By the end of the Han dynasty, wheat-f.G'...:rproducts, such as boiled noodles and steamed sesame breads. \<--ere achieving vast popularity; even the emperor ate boiled noodles. f ~~ that time on noodle vending became a thriving business-these \-endc!"'S being among the first of that noisy, colorful array of entrepreneu:-s '-:x: populate the streets of China. Like other cultures, the Chinese elevated these staples wheD ~~ came to ceremonial foods and offerings to the

more for the extension of ritual and hospitality than for the displa)" G: culinary art. The Mongols remained nomads even when they ,,'ere :'l1 power, and the Chinese viewed them with some disdain. With the restoration of Chinese power in 1370 under the first \E;-:g emperor, agricultural conditions began to improve, and soon rice ,,-as standard fare. With a population that was basically well fed, food on<:e again took on value as something meant to be enjoyed in all its \"ariei\". From the

sixteenth century on the expansion of commerce and genera; prosperity began to have an effect on northern cooking, in the sense that more foods were offered. Northern cooking had always been sim- The Origin of Chinese Noodles == 15 pIer than southern and still is, but the Ming dynasty redistributed many of the riches of the land. The sixteenth century onward also saw a new culinary pleasure develop-excursion boats that offered prepared foods from restaurants. Among the delicacies delivered

purchase them in I'''xc's al (:hinese markets. When very fresh, they are slightly damp and KIVI'••If Ihe marveloLls smell or fresh dough. I 1111 «" ,kc'd YIIII Iii is g-rayish while; after cooking it becomes translucent 11101 IIII' I",Olln' is somcwhat crisp. There arc two ways to use this kind of 1'11'1111 H'I':( hII' is 10 1'111Ilit: shel'l ililo ~I/~-inch squares, to LIseas wrappers; II,,' ••1111'1' is 101'111it inlo vC'r)'filiI' shreds. Thcse slrips arc pressed aroLlnd .1I1.dl

!car glaze. Transfer the filling to a bowl and let it cool. It can be made ahead ime and refrigerated, covered with plastic wrap. ,01 I THE DOUGH FOR THE SHRIMP AND MEAT DUMPLING WRAPPERS pound wheat starch, about 1'12 cups I/~cup tapioca flour '11 teaspoon coarse salt 1Y2 cups boiling water 2 tablespoons corn oil or peanut oil '12 !\tAKING THE DUMPLING WRAPPERS '1llhinc the wheat starch, tapioca flour, and salt in a large mixing bowl. ~1.1kc a well in the center and pour in the boiling

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