Foul Deeds & Suspicious Deaths in London's East End

Foul Deeds & Suspicious Deaths in London's East End

Geoffrey Howse

Language: English

Pages: 192

ISBN: B00DN5VCQA

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Foul Deeds & Suspicious Deaths in London's East End

Geoffrey Howse

Language: English

Pages: 192

ISBN: B00DN5VCQA

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


For centuries London's East End has been associated with some of the worst elements of human depravity, where foul deeds and murder were commonplace; and in 1888 the area's notoriety was added to by the horrific murders committed by Jack the Ripper. The East End was populated by people crammed together in close knit communities. As the East End had grown from the ancient villages along the river, so much of the village atmosphere remained and rivalry existed throughout the area despite there being some of the worst depravity and vilest slums to be found anywhere in the country. For instance the residents of Bethnal Green looked down their noses at those from Hoxton, barely half a mile away. During the 1930's after the depression a Government report estimated 60% of the children in Bethnal Green suffered from malnutrition and 85% of the housing was unsatisfactory. These were the times when the notorious Kray Twins were cutting their teeth. For centuries the East End's notoriety for foul deeds has remained unsurpassed in the annals of crime in this country. This claim to fame, is not without justification, as the pages of this book show.

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injured. The collapsed stand can clearly be seen in the engraving. On 12 May 1641 the crowds gathered on Tower Hill. At eleven o’clock Sir William Balfour came to see if the prisoner was ready. Dressed in black, as was his custom, he was calmly waiting with his two chaplains. Balfour, afraid that the mob would tear Wentworth to pieces, advised him to send for his coach. Wentworth declined, saying, ‘No. I would sooner look death in the face and I hope the people too; I care not how I die whether

Earl of Argyll went to Scotland with the intention of rallying support from Campbell lands and the Borders, while Monmouth rallied his supporters in England. Then both would march on London. But when Argyll landed at Kintyre, in May, he found his lands were already occupied by the Marquess of Atholl, who was loyal to James ll. Meanwhile, Monmouth had landed at Lyme Regis, Dorset, early in June, with a few followers. He declared that James had started the Great Fire of London and had killed

Wainwright asked Alfred Stokes, who lived nearby at 34 Bakers’ Row (today’s Vallance Road) if he would help him carry some parcels from his old warehouse. Stokes, although still a young man, had known Henry Wainwright for seventeen or eighteen years and had for most of that time been in his employ as an out-worker. More recently he had become Wainwright’s fellow manager in the employ of Mr Martin. He was more than happy to oblige his highly regarded, former employer, Mr Wainwright. He accompanied

to collect contributions from their brethren, towards supporting themselves in idleness, in order to distress their masters, and to oblige them to advance their wages.’ The meeting was being held in an upstairs room. When a soldier entered, he was immediately shot dead. A fierce and bloody battle followed as firing on both sides broke out, the patrons, downstairs in the tap room taking what cover they could. When the battle was over, three innocent civilians were killed, four cutters were

merchants were at their wit’s end. A partial solution to the problem was found in 1792 with the formation of ‘The Preventative Service’, which the early River Police were known as, until 1839, when they became part of the Metropolitan Police, with the special privilege of posing as City constables. An interesting article appeared in The Strand magazine in the 1880s, which gave an insight into the workings of the River Police: … From a million pounds’ worth of property stolen yearly a hundred

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