Girl Hunter: Revolutionizing the Way We Eat, One Hunt at a Time

Girl Hunter: Revolutionizing the Way We Eat, One Hunt at a Time

Georgia Pellegrini

Language: English

Pages: 256

ISBN: 0738216054

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Girl Hunter: Revolutionizing the Way We Eat, One Hunt at a Time

Georgia Pellegrini

Language: English

Pages: 256

ISBN: 0738216054

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


What happens when a classically-trained New York chef and fearless omnivore heads out of the city and into the wild to track down the ingredients for her meals? After abandoning Wall Street to embrace her lifelong love of cooking, Georgia Pellegrini comes face to face with her first kill. From honoring that first turkey to realizing that the only way we truly know where our meat comes from is if we hunt it ourselves, Pellegrini embarks on a wild ride into the real world of local, organic, and sustainable food.
 
Teaming up with veteran hunters, she trav­els over field and stream in search of the main course—from quail to venison and wild boar, from elk to javelina and squirrel. Pellegrini’s road trip careens from the back of an ATV chasing wild hogs along the banks of the Mississippi to a dove hunt with beer and barbeque, to the birthplace of the Delta Blues. Along the way, she meets an array of unexpected characters—from the Commish, a venerated lifelong hunter, to the lawyer-by day, duck-hunting-Bayou-philosopher at dawn—who offer surprising lessons about food and life. Pellegrini also discovers the dangerous underbelly of hunting when an outing turns illegal—and dangerous.
 
More than a food-laden hunting narrative, Girl Hunteralso teaches you how to be a self-sufficient eater. Each chapter offers recipes for finger-licking dishes like:
  • wild turkey and oyster stew
  • stuffed quail
  • pheasant tagine
  • venison sausage
  • fundamental stocks, brines, sauces, and rubs
  • suggestions for interchanging proteins within each recipe
Each dish, like each story, is an adventure from begin­ning to end.
 
An inspiring, illuminating, and often funny jour­ney into unexplored territories of haute cuisine, Girl Hunter captures the joy of rolling up your sleeves and getting to the heart of where the food you eat comes from.

Seoul Food Korean Cookbook: Korean Cooking from Kimchi and Bibimbap to Fried Chicken and Bingsoo

Besh Big Easy: 101 Home Cooked New Orleans Recipes

Ruhlman's How to Braise: Foolproof Techniques and Recipes for the Home Cook

What's Cooking on Okinawa: A Community Cookbook

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

richer soil. This place has always been a slowly cascading sequence of anomalies; a place where people fought the elements and the river for decades to become great established families, transforming their lives from hunting panthers in the overgrown cane jungle that engulfed their plantations, to attending European opera festivals—this place would come to be known as the Alluvial Empire. There was a time not long ago when cotton was king and the settlers of this region were considered “the

“Get your head down on the gun,” he continues. “Can you see the red dot on the end of your shotgun?” “Yeah,” I reply. But I can’t see the turkey. “What happens if I miss the first shot?” I whisper, trying to veil my rising panic. “Don’t worry about it,” the Commish says, guiding my gun as I look through the scope like a blind man in a maze, with no idea of what is beyond the camo blind or where the ol’ gobbler is doing his dance. I see nothing but the makeshift fence, the cluster of trees and

are done with their stories and their laughter, and the last pitcher has been emptied of its last drop of foam, people begin to trickle out, and we do, too, walking out under the lanterns laced with cobwebs, where the air smells like fish and chips lingering from the pub kitchen, back over the wooden footbridge, back along the silent country blacktop, to the doorstep of Ellington Estate. At eight o’clock the next morning, the muted light leaks through the yellow taffeta curtains of my room, and

farming around them can suddenly farm across them. When this happens, the nesting grounds, with their good, tall, grass cover, disappear. Blended into the marshland that connects with Bayou Leary, Peter lets out a hail call, the mating call of a female, then he lets out a feed call. “That’s our signal to the other hunters that we aren’t seeing anything,” Peter laughs, letting the sentence die. There is an art to calling ducks—the high-pitched preep-preep of the male teal; the soft, rasping kreep

and unpopular foods—depending on whom you ask. Foie gras, for example, beloved in France, was for a time banned in Chicago. Then there’s liver and onions in Britain, Leberwurst in Germany, fish liver sashimi in Japan, and the Jewish dish turned idiom, chopped liver. I like it not just because it tastes good, but also because it is a way to turn an often overlooked part of the animal into something delicious. Some people avoid liver because they think it stores toxins, but the liver doesn’t store

Download sample

Download