Hindu Gods and Goddesses: 300 Illustrations from "The Hindu Pantheon"

Hindu Gods and Goddesses: 300 Illustrations from "The Hindu Pantheon"

Edward Moor

Language: English

Pages: 134

ISBN: B00A7IUOME

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub

Hindu Gods and Goddesses: 300 Illustrations from "The Hindu Pantheon"

Edward Moor

Language: English

Pages: 134

ISBN: B00A7IUOME

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Reflecting the spirit of East Indian myths, legends, and fables, these illustrations were compiled by one of the nineteenth century's foremost Orientalists. Edward Moor published The Hindu Pantheon in 1810, and this new volume draws upon his exposition of India's religious iconography to offer a spectacular array of images of Hindu deities.

Dramatic engravings and line drawings include scenes from the Ramayana and Mahabharata as well as temple images of Krishna, Vishnu, Siva, and other major gods and goddesses. Many are derived from bronze figurines; others are reproduced from manuscript illustrations. All appear with captions for ease of identification.

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the VARÂHÂVATÂRA : or the Fish-, Tortoise-, and Boar-incarnations. PL. 49. The churning of the ocean, during the second incarnation of Vishnu, for the recovery of the Amrita, or elixir of immortality, and other valuable gifts, lost to man by the Deluge. In the picture Vishnu appears thrice : as the tortoise, as seated on the mountain Mandara, and in his place among the chief deities on the left. The mountain served as an axle, the serpent Vâsuki. as a rope, and the Asurâs, or powers of evil, as

Chakra of Vishnu. 29—33 are of doubtful meaning and authority. 34—37 mark generally, though not exclusively, Çiva, Pârvatî, and their votaries. 38 is seen on Kali, a form of Dêvî, in PL. 27. 39 is thought to represent the Linga. The triangle, with the apex upwards, as in 40 and others, belongs to Çiva, as representing fire ; the inverted triangle, in 41 and others, is Vishnu’s symbol, representing water. 47 and the following, containing horizontal lines, belong to Çiva, Pârvatî, and their kindred

deities, and their adherents. In PL. 18 many of these sectarial marks are well seen on the foreheads of the different figures. 71—74 are rare, and, as well as 84, belong rather to certain great families than to religious sects. 75—83; the crescent seems to belong exclusively to Mahâdêva and his family. 85—88 are found on some of the Avatârs of Vishnu. 89 “is taken from a stout piece of copper of the same size, rising, layer over layer, as the circles lessen upwards,” and containing a mystic

DĒVĪ, or BHAVĀNĪ honored by 2. MAHĀDĒVA, 3.VISHNU, 4. BRAHMĀ, 5.GANĒSA and 6. INDRA. From a picture. DURGĀ or ACTIVE VlRTUE slaying MAHISHĀSURA a personification of VICE. Above is DĒVĪ. From pictures. From cafts in brafs DURGĀ, or ACTIVE VIRTUE, slaying the monster MAHISHĀSURA, or VICE personified. From subjects in brafs. DĒVĪ or BHAVĀNĪ in different characters. From images in brafs &c. DURGĀ, DĒVĪ, or BHAVĀNĪ, different forms. From images in brafs &c. DĒVĪ, or the GODDESS, consort of

I. 10), reposing on the serpent ÇESHA, (called also Ananta,) contemplating and willing the creation of the world. The creative power, BRAHMÂ, is seen springing forth upon a lotus to the surface of the ocean. The figure chafing Vishnu’s feet is Lakshmi. Below : (From a tinted picture.) ÇIVA and Parvati conjoined, under this form called Arddhanârî. The same combination is seen in figs. 1 and 2 of PL. 24. PL. 8. (1) (From a bronze cast.) VISHNU, with his wives Lakshmî and Satyavâmâ; Brahmâ, as in

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